LSA Families and Individuals

Notes


Mary C. BAKER

MARY C. RAWLS
   The death of Mary C. Rawls, age 78, on Aug. 15, has been reported from Fairbury, Neb.
   Born Nov. 4, 1881, in Washington County, she married Rev. Adolphus C. Rawls Aug. 28, 1924.  He died in 1928.
   She was a member of the Baptist Church where she taught Sunday School and played the piano.
   Survivors inlcude one sister, Sophia Baker of Hollenberg in Washington County, and one brother, Fred Baker of Mayetta. (Kansas)


Jonathan SHIELDS

1870 Census Ohio #219
Shields, C.B.      age 34  (b. 1836) Farmer b. Penn.
         Susannah      29                      Ohio
         Eva           10                      Ohio
         Delia          2                      Ohio
#236
Shields,  C.C.      age 55                      Penn.
         Mary E.       30
         Julian M.     24 female               Penn.
         Margaret A.   12                      Ohio


Marriage Notes for Jonathan Shields and Minerva BIGETON-5263

Line in Record @F1092@ (MRIN 31319) from GEDCOM file not recognized:


Robert SHIELDS

Shields Genealogy by Margaret O. Derrick Coleman, pg. 8

   Robert was a wheel-wright by trade.  He came with his parents to southern Indiana in 1808 or 1809.  He served in the War of 1812.  There were three daughters and three sons.  Robert was a wheel-wright and an artist in wood carving.  The little spinning wheel he made and gave to his sister Nancy Elliot as a wedding gift in 1815, was brought to Kansas in 1860 and was still in use in 1875.  Marriage date also given as 1817.

   Elizabeth outlived Robert by 65 years and died in 1891.  Robert was a veteran of the War of 1812 and was a wheelwright and a wood carver. He moved to Indiana in 1808 with his father's family.

Elsewhere, Robert's children are listed as:
  Jeannet Shields
  William W. Shields
  Elizabeth Shields
  Emily Shields
  Elijah Shields
  Jonathan Shields


Descendants of William F. and Margaret Wilson Shields

Robert Shields, the first son and oldest child of William and Margaret was born in 1790 in the fort in Sevier County, Tenn.  He came with his parents to southern Indiana in 1808 or 1809.  He served in the war of 1812.  Robert married Elizabeth DAVIS about 1815.  There were three daughters and three sons: Elizabeth, Emily, Jeanette; William; Elijah born 1824 and Jonathan born Feb. 16, 1826, near Westport, Decatur, IN.  Robert, the father, was a wheel-wright  and an artist in wood carving.  The little spinning wheel which he made and gave to his sister Nancy Elliott has as a wedding gift in 1815 and was brought to Kansas in 1860 and was still in use in 1875.  Robert died in 1826.  His wife Elizabeth outlive him 65 years, she passed away in 1891.


Robert CLIFTON

Will of Robert Clifton
                 Of Lewes, Sussex on Delaware
                  Transcribed by Opal Lousin
  In the name of God Amen, the tenth day of May Anno Dom, 1720 I Robert
Clifton of Lewis in the County of Sussex on Delaware, yeoman, being very sick
and weak of body but of perfect mind and memory, thanks being given unto God.
Therefore, calling unto mind the mortality of my baody and knowning that it is appointed for all men once to die, do make and ordain this my last will and testament.  That is to say principally and first of all I give and recommend my soul into the hands of God that give it and my body I recomment to the earth to be buried in decent Christian burial at the discretion of my executrix, nothing doubting but at the general resurrection I shall recieve the same againby the mighty power of God and as touching such worldly estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me in this life, I give, devise and dispose of ye same in the following manner and form.  I will and desire and dispose of ye same in the following manner and form.  I will and desire that my lawful debts and funeral charges be first paid and discharged.  Impr. I give and bequeath to my daughter Sarah Clifton my little mare called pennis with the increase thereof to her and her heirs forever.

   Item.  I give and bequeath unto my two sons Thomas and Benjamin Clifton all my plantation in Rehoboth and my house and lot in Lewis town both in the
country of Sussex on Delaware to be equally divided between them when the
eldest shall arrive at the age of twenty one years, to them their heirs and
assigns forever and till then to the use of my loving wife Ann Clifton towards the bringing up of my children and at her disposal and discretion to see if much strained in the maintenance and bringing up of my children before my eldest son shall be of the age of one and twenty years.

   Item.  I hereby ordain and appoint my said loving wife Ann Clifton my sold and only executrix of this my last will and testament and I do hereby utterly disannull revoke and make void all and every other former testaments, wills, legacies and bequests ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my last will and testament.

  In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year
above written.  Signed sealed and published pronounced and declared by the said Robert Clifton as his last will and testament in the presence of us the
subcribers - James Simson, Edwar Naws, James White, Sussex pt. memorandum the
sixteenth day of May 1720, appeared before me Philip Russel Dept. Regrs
appointed in the probate of will and testaments and granting letters of
administration for the county of aforesaid James Simson, Edward Naws and James White evidence to the within and above will subcribing and on their solemn oaths did declare the within written instrument was by the testament Robert Clifton in their sight presence and hearing, signed sealed published pronounced and delcared to be his last will and testament and that at the doing thereof the said testator to the best of their knowledge and judgement was of sound disposing mind and memory.
                           Test. Philip Russel, Dp. Regr.

Will found in Sussex County, Delaware - 10 May 1720, of Lewes, Delaware,
daughter Sarah Clifton, two sons Thomas and Benjamin Clifton, =(Plantation in
Rehobeth and house in Lewes), proved 16 May 1720.  See above.
    This Robert Clifton was, therefore, the father of Thomas Clifton who was
the father of Ann Clifton who married James Anderson II, and they became
parents of our Elijah Anderson I who married Susanna Cain and had Elijah
Anderson II who married Rosa Ann Bray in Morgan Co., Indiana abt 1837.


Elija DAVIS

Most liikely of the Quaker families that followed Boone into KY from the Carolinas and spread out joining the other migrating families. clues may help to look thru Quaker records.  Larry Anderson


William SHIELDS

    Birth information sent by Ron Rasmussen.  See pg. 6 of Shields Gen. by Mary O' Derrick.

   Wm. Shield, 4th son and 5th child of Robert and Nancy Stockton Shields William was born abt. 1768.  A youth of 15 or 16 years when they came to the new home across the mountains into North Carolina.  William is described as having ravan black hair and deep blue eyes, tall, rather slender, lithe and strong.  He was feared by the Indians, yet he did not make it a practice of hunting them down, neither did he have any deeprooted hatred for them as did his nephew John Tipton.  On one occasion he did not hesitate to preceed against them.  When he did they gave him wide berth, for he moved with calm, fearless determination.  He was a man of highest courage and keen vision, with a quickness of hearing and a skill in woods craft, exceptional even among pioneers of the forest. It is said he excelled the savage in this respect, on his own ground.  He is credited with being able to walk through the dry leaves and make no perceptible sound.  He could trail an Indian, even in the night and find his way about unerringly without moon or stars to guide him.  An adapt at imitating the birds or other forest sounds.  He could distinquish a Seminole or a Cherokee or a friendly Chicgasaw, as far as he could see him.  In the understanding of the Indians character he excelled all his brothers except John.  David excelled him in Physical strength.  William was hard working, he was neither better nor worse off than the average of his neighbors.  (He was Natty Bumpo.)  He was especially devoted to his family.  He served in the Revolution and was prominent in the campaign against the Indians and one of the leaders of Tipton's faction in the political feud with John Sevier.
    William had taken up a claim, broken sod, improved it by fencing a few acres and set out an orchard while still living at the Fort.  They had many thrilling experiences in those days at the Fort.  One day William and Margaret went out to the claim to gather peaches, as they went through the gate they noticed macosin tracks, also the queer actions of the dog.  Going further they saw Indians dodging from tree to tree, they of course made a hasty retreat, yet William did not fail to put up the bars.  Knowing they could not reach the Fort before the Indians would overtake them they went into a thicket.  Margaret was tripped by a vine and fell with the baby in her arms.  To quite the baby, she quickly gave it the breast, William held the dogs quiet with one hand while he had his hunting knife ready for action in the other.  As he watched, seven Indians passed by, "Huh", he said.  "Had I known there were but 7, I would have let the dogs loose, they could have handled two, I could have taken two or three and the rest would have run."
    Another time when the hostile Indians were maurading in the vicinity, William was off guard, an Indian crept up within range and was preparing to shoot when one of William's dogs discovered his presence and gave warning,
enabling William to dodge behind a tree just in time.
   Williams moved on his land about 1795, residing there until 1808, going first into Logan Co., Ohio and a year later they moved into southern Indiana, living in the fort.
   There were nine children born to William and Margaret: Rover, 1790; William, 1792; James, 1794; Elizabeth, 1796; Nancy Agnes, 1798; Samuel, 1800; Rhoda, 1802; Rebecca, 1805 and Jennie or Janet, Nette born in 1808, all in
Seiver Co., Tenn., on Little Pigeon River.  About 1813, Margaret the wife and mother, passed on.  Elizabeth, the eldest, was married to John Lindsey, June 14, 1814.
   In his book, The Descendents of Robert and Margaret Emmert SHIELDS, A. Randolph SHILEDS has the death date as 1822.

                        From SHIELDS HISTORY, 1980 Pg. 62
   William spent his boyhood in Augusta C. and migrated with his father and mother, Robert and Nancy Stockton Shields to the wilderness of North Carolina, presently Sevier Co., TN.

                        See SHIELDS HISTORY 1980, pg. 63.
   William and several of his brothers migrated to Indiana about 1808. Margaret (Wilson) Shields died 1813 at Madison Ind.  William married (2) 10 Sept 1817 at Logans Fort, Amanda LOGAN, dau. of Ezkiel Logan and a niece  of his first wife.  There was a bitter opposition on the part of his first children to this marriage.Fourth of the Ten Brothers. According to John A. Shields, William settled at Madison, Indiana in 1808 and soon thereafter at Brewersville, where he raised a large family. By his second wife, Amanda Logan, he had a small family. He settled in Washington County, Indiana after marrying Amanda. John A. Shields was his great-grandson.

Judge Littell reports that William's children bitterly opposed his second marriage, which was to his first wife's niece.

John A. Shields says William migrated with the family to Sevier County and, with his father and four of his brothers, preceded the rest of the family, walking from Watauga to the site of Shields Fort, seven miles south of the present city of Sevierville, Tennessee.

William's first wife, Margaret, was from a nearby settlement on the French Broad. They lived in the family fort on Middle Creek for about 10 years, then moved into a cabin of their own nearby. Margaret was a daughter of Samuel Wilson, an early pioneer of East Tennessee, prominent in the campaigns against the Indians and one of the leaders of Tipton's faction in the feud with John Sevier, which had been brought about by political differences and which culminated in the attempt on the part of Sevier to establish the independent State of Franklin.

John A. Shields wrote: "He doubtless had many thrilling experiences. One story concerning him has come down to us. In the early days of the settlement in Tennessee, while the Shields families were still living in Shields Fort, William took up a claim and set out an orchard of fruit trees on part of it. The orchard was a mile or so from the fort. One day, William and his wife, Margaret, went out to the farm to gather peaches. She had the baby along. The orchard was fenced, and soon after they had entered the enclosure, they saw some Indians dodging about among the trees, and also discovered their tracks. They started for home, putting back the bars as they went out. They knew if they were discovered they could not reach the fort before the Indians overtook them, and they had no idea how many there were. So they went into a plum thicket to hide and watch. Just as she was entering the thicket, Margaret caught her foot in a vine and fell, with the baby in her arms. There was moment of awful suspense, but quickly giving it [the baby] her breast, she quieted it. William held the dog with one hand, and in the other hand held a hunting knife poised to kill it instantly if it barked. In those days, every settler had a dog, sometimes several of them, and never ventured into the woods without it. To the watchful sagacity of his dogs, William once owed his life. These dogs hated Indians, and in the forest they would scent one as they scented deer, and having struck the trail of one, they would not be quieted until their warnings were heeded. The Indians also feared them and would often flee before them as from human antagonists. By some chance, the dog had not discovered the presence of the Indians in the orchard. Soon, seven Indians crept out of the enclosure and went their way. 'Huh,' said William jokingly, 'If I had known there were only seven of them, I would have killed five, and the other two would have run, and we could have gathered the peaches.' Though but a legend, and perhaps embellished in the telling, it is still indicative of the times that William and his family endured during the 24 years they lived in what is now eastern Tennessee."

John A. Shields says William and several of his brothers, along with their families, migrated in 1808 to Indiana, which was as wild and unsettled as Tennessee had been a quarter-century earlier. In 1808, only 911 votes were cast in the entire territory. The Shields families crossed the Ohio River at the present site of Mackport, Indiana on a ferry that had been established that year. William helped his brother James build a fort on the present site of Seymour, Indiana, then went to Logan County, Ohio for a year. Returning to Indiana, he settled at Madison and started an orchard. After a brief time at Madison, the family settled near Brewersville in Jennings County. John A. Shields says Magaret, William's first wife, died at Madison in 1813 or 1814 and that in 1817, he married Amanda Logan, sister of Col. E. D. Logan of Washington County, Indiana. They settled on Walnut Ridge, hear Kossuth, Indiana, where William died in 1824 and Amanda in 1826. John A. Shields (who is descended from William and Amanda), confirms that Amanda was the daughter of Margaret Shields' sister.

In Jennings County Order Book 1822-37: Page 30 - 23 September 1823, Lewis L. Scott, assignee of Samuel, Robert and James Shields, of John Lindsey and wife Elizabeth late Shields, of John Davis and wife Rebecca late Shields and Rhoda Shiels, part of the heirs of William Shields, deceased, petition to partition real estate vs. the same as above and Jane, Sarah Ann, Jesse, John Ezekiel Logan Shields and Elizabeth Shields, all heirs of said William. Page 52 - Land is fraction 23 & 24-8-8. Page 55 - States that William Shields in his lifetime did execute a bond to John Winchell for 133 acres, land as stated above, dated 5 August 1821. Commissioners to convey deed. Page 89 - Ezra F. Peabody, as administrator of William Shields estate, petitions to sell real estate as insufficient. Ninety-four acres remaining of the above fractional sections. Page 110 - Lists again the heirs of William and adds Jane, Sarah Ann, John, Jesse and Ezekiel Logan Shields, infant heirs of the deceased. Page 118 - Shows that Stott was appointed guardian of Jane, Sarah, Jesse, John and Ezekiel Logan Shields on 27 March 1826.

John A. Shields in "Three Kansas Pioneer Families--Stalker-Shields-Martin," published May 1949 at Seymour, Indiana, reports the date of William's death as 1826.

Research on the above: "The Shields Family" by John Arthur Shields, 1917; Jennings County, Indiana vital records and newspapers and various Indiana county marriage records (researched by Richard B. Groharing); "Shields Genealogy" by Mary O. Derrick Coleman, edited by Becky Hardin, Mooresville, Indiana, April 1979, published by Fulton County Historical Society, Rochester, Indiana; "The John Tipton Papers," compiled by Glen A. Blackburn, published by The Indiana Historical Bureau, Indianapolis, Indiana, 1942; "Three Kansas Pioneer Families, Stalker-Shields-Martin," by John Arthur Shields, Seymour, Indiana, May 1949 (researched by Francis S. Shields).

Bill Navey gives William Shields' date of death as 24 May 1817 and the place as Washington, Indiana.

After Margaret’s death in 1814, William Shields married Amanda Logan, Sept. 10, 1817.  Their children were Sarah Jane, born June 5, 1818; Jesse, born Sept 20, 1820; Ezekiel. Born May 20, 1822 near Madison, Ind.


Margaret WILSON

Also death given as Madison Co., IN.  Marriage occurred at the home of Margret's father on the French Broad River, about 30 miles east of the present city of Knoxville, Tennessee.


William SHIELDS

    Birth information sent by Ron Rasmussen.  See pg. 6 of Shields Gen. by Mary O' Derrick.

   Wm. Shield, 4th son and 5th child of Robert and Nancy Stockton Shields William was born abt. 1768.  A youth of 15 or 16 years when they came to the new home across the mountains into North Carolina.  William is described as having ravan black hair and deep blue eyes, tall, rather slender, lithe and strong.  He was feared by the Indians, yet he did not make it a practice of hunting them down, neither did he have any deeprooted hatred for them as did his nephew John Tipton.  On one occasion he did not hesitate to preceed against them.  When he did they gave him wide berth, for he moved with calm, fearless determination.  He was a man of highest courage and keen vision, with a quickness of hearing and a skill in woods craft, exceptional even among pioneers of the forest. It is said he excelled the savage in this respect, on his own ground.  He is credited with being able to walk through the dry leaves and make no perceptible sound.  He could trail an Indian, even in the night and find his way about unerringly without moon or stars to guide him.  An adapt at imitating the birds or other forest sounds.  He could distinquish a Seminole or a Cherokee or a friendly Chicgasaw, as far as he could see him.  In the understanding of the Indians character he excelled all his brothers except John.  David excelled him in Physical strength.  William was hard working, he was neither better nor worse off than the average of his neighbors.  (He was Natty Bumpo.)  He was especially devoted to his family.  He served in the Revolution and was prominent in the campaign against the Indians and one of the leaders of Tipton's faction in the political feud with John Sevier.
    William had taken up a claim, broken sod, improved it by fencing a few acres and set out an orchard while still living at the Fort.  They had many thrilling experiences in those days at the Fort.  One day William and Margaret went out to the claim to gather peaches, as they went through the gate they noticed macosin tracks, also the queer actions of the dog.  Going further they saw Indians dodging from tree to tree, they of course made a hasty retreat, yet William did not fail to put up the bars.  Knowing they could not reach the Fort before the Indians would overtake them they went into a thicket.  Margaret was tripped by a vine and fell with the baby in her arms.  To quite the baby, she quickly gave it the breast, William held the dogs quiet with one hand while he had his hunting knife ready for action in the other.  As he watched, seven Indians passed by, "Huh", he said.  "Had I known there were but 7, I would have let the dogs loose, they could have handled two, I could have taken two or three and the rest would have run."
    Another time when the hostile Indians were maurading in the vicinity, William was off guard, an Indian crept up within range and was preparing to shoot when one of William's dogs discovered his presence and gave warning,
enabling William to dodge behind a tree just in time.
   Williams moved on his land about 1795, residing there until 1808, going first into Logan Co., Ohio and a year later they moved into southern Indiana, living in the fort.
   There were nine children born to William and Margaret: Rover, 1790; William, 1792; James, 1794; Elizabeth, 1796; Nancy Agnes, 1798; Samuel, 1800; Rhoda, 1802; Rebecca, 1805 and Jennie or Janet, Nette born in 1808, all in
Seiver Co., Tenn., on Little Pigeon River.  About 1813, Margaret the wife and mother, passed on.  Elizabeth, the eldest, was married to John Lindsey, June 14, 1814.
   In his book, The Descendents of Robert and Margaret Emmert SHIELDS, A. Randolph SHILEDS has the death date as 1822.

                        From SHIELDS HISTORY, 1980 Pg. 62
   William spent his boyhood in Augusta C. and migrated with his father and mother, Robert and Nancy Stockton Shields to the wilderness of North Carolina, presently Sevier Co., TN.

                        See SHIELDS HISTORY 1980, pg. 63.
   William and several of his brothers migrated to Indiana about 1808. Margaret (Wilson) Shields died 1813 at Madison Ind.  William married (2) 10 Sept 1817 at Logans Fort, Amanda LOGAN, dau. of Ezkiel Logan and a niece  of his first wife.  There was a bitter opposition on the part of his first children to this marriage.Fourth of the Ten Brothers. According to John A. Shields, William settled at Madison, Indiana in 1808 and soon thereafter at Brewersville, where he raised a large family. By his second wife, Amanda Logan, he had a small family. He settled in Washington County, Indiana after marrying Amanda. John A. Shields was his great-grandson.

Judge Littell reports that William's children bitterly opposed his second marriage, which was to his first wife's niece.

John A. Shields says William migrated with the family to Sevier County and, with his father and four of his brothers, preceded the rest of the family, walking from Watauga to the site of Shields Fort, seven miles south of the present city of Sevierville, Tennessee.

William's first wife, Margaret, was from a nearby settlement on the French Broad. They lived in the family fort on Middle Creek for about 10 years, then moved into a cabin of their own nearby. Margaret was a daughter of Samuel Wilson, an early pioneer of East Tennessee, prominent in the campaigns against the Indians and one of the leaders of Tipton's faction in the feud with John Sevier, which had been brought about by political differences and which culminated in the attempt on the part of Sevier to establish the independent State of Franklin.

John A. Shields wrote: "He doubtless had many thrilling experiences. One story concerning him has come down to us. In the early days of the settlement in Tennessee, while the Shields families were still living in Shields Fort, William took up a claim and set out an orchard of fruit trees on part of it. The orchard was a mile or so from the fort. One day, William and his wife, Margaret, went out to the farm to gather peaches. She had the baby along. The orchard was fenced, and soon after they had entered the enclosure, they saw some Indians dodging about among the trees, and also discovered their tracks. They started for home, putting back the bars as they went out. They knew if they were discovered they could not reach the fort before the Indians overtook them, and they had no idea how many there were. So they went into a plum thicket to hide and watch. Just as she was entering the thicket, Margaret caught her foot in a vine and fell, with the baby in her arms. There was moment of awful suspense, but quickly giving it [the baby] her breast, she quieted it. William held the dog with one hand, and in the other hand held a hunting knife poised to kill it instantly if it barked. In those days, every settler had a dog, sometimes several of them, and never ventured into the woods without it. To the watchful sagacity of his dogs, William once owed his life. These dogs hated Indians, and in the forest they would scent one as they scented deer, and having struck the trail of one, they would not be quieted until their warnings were heeded. The Indians also feared them and would often flee before them as from human antagonists. By some chance, the dog had not discovered the presence of the Indians in the orchard. Soon, seven Indians crept out of the enclosure and went their way. 'Huh,' said William jokingly, 'If I had known there were only seven of them, I would have killed five, and the other two would have run, and we could have gathered the peaches.' Though but a legend, and perhaps embellished in the telling, it is still indicative of the times that William and his family endured during the 24 years they lived in what is now eastern Tennessee."

John A. Shields says William and several of his brothers, along with their families, migrated in 1808 to Indiana, which was as wild and unsettled as Tennessee had been a quarter-century earlier. In 1808, only 911 votes were cast in the entire territory. The Shields families crossed the Ohio River at the present site of Mackport, Indiana on a ferry that had been established that year. William helped his brother James build a fort on the present site of Seymour, Indiana, then went to Logan County, Ohio for a year. Returning to Indiana, he settled at Madison and started an orchard. After a brief time at Madison, the family settled near Brewersville in Jennings County. John A. Shields says Magaret, William's first wife, died at Madison in 1813 or 1814 and that in 1817, he married Amanda Logan, sister of Col. E. D. Logan of Washington County, Indiana. They settled on Walnut Ridge, hear Kossuth, Indiana, where William died in 1824 and Amanda in 1826. John A. Shields (who is descended from William and Amanda), confirms that Amanda was the daughter of Margaret Shields' sister.

In Jennings County Order Book 1822-37: Page 30 - 23 September 1823, Lewis L. Scott, assignee of Samuel, Robert and James Shields, of John Lindsey and wife Elizabeth late Shields, of John Davis and wife Rebecca late Shields and Rhoda Shiels, part of the heirs of William Shields, deceased, petition to partition real estate vs. the same as above and Jane, Sarah Ann, Jesse, John Ezekiel Logan Shields and Elizabeth Shields, all heirs of said William. Page 52 - Land is fraction 23 & 24-8-8. Page 55 - States that William Shields in his lifetime did execute a bond to John Winchell for 133 acres, land as stated above, dated 5 August 1821. Commissioners to convey deed. Page 89 - Ezra F. Peabody, as administrator of William Shields estate, petitions to sell real estate as insufficient. Ninety-four acres remaining of the above fractional sections. Page 110 - Lists again the heirs of William and adds Jane, Sarah Ann, John, Jesse and Ezekiel Logan Shields, infant heirs of the deceased. Page 118 - Shows that Stott was appointed guardian of Jane, Sarah, Jesse, John and Ezekiel Logan Shields on 27 March 1826.

John A. Shields in "Three Kansas Pioneer Families--Stalker-Shields-Martin," published May 1949 at Seymour, Indiana, reports the date of William's death as 1826.

Research on the above: "The Shields Family" by John Arthur Shields, 1917; Jennings County, Indiana vital records and newspapers and various Indiana county marriage records (researched by Richard B. Groharing); "Shields Genealogy" by Mary O. Derrick Coleman, edited by Becky Hardin, Mooresville, Indiana, April 1979, published by Fulton County Historical Society, Rochester, Indiana; "The John Tipton Papers," compiled by Glen A. Blackburn, published by The Indiana Historical Bureau, Indianapolis, Indiana, 1942; "Three Kansas Pioneer Families, Stalker-Shields-Martin," by John Arthur Shields, Seymour, Indiana, May 1949 (researched by Francis S. Shields).

Bill Navey gives William Shields' date of death as 24 May 1817 and the place as Washington, Indiana.

After Margaret’s death in 1814, William Shields married Amanda Logan, Sept. 10, 1817.  Their children were Sarah Jane, born June 5, 1818; Jesse, born Sept 20, 1820; Ezekiel. Born May 20, 1822 near Madison, Ind.


Amanda LOGAN

    Birth date differs from different report, other date of abt. 1795.  Some sources give the date of Samuel and Amanda's marriage as 10 September 1817.


John SHIELDS

    Died in infancy.


William SHIELDS

    Birth information sent by Ron Rasmussen.  See pg. 6 of Shields Gen. by Mary O' Derrick.

   Wm. Shield, 4th son and 5th child of Robert and Nancy Stockton Shields William was born abt. 1768.  A youth of 15 or 16 years when they came to the new home across the mountains into North Carolina.  William is described as having ravan black hair and deep blue eyes, tall, rather slender, lithe and strong.  He was feared by the Indians, yet he did not make it a practice of hunting them down, neither did he have any deeprooted hatred for them as did his nephew John Tipton.  On one occasion he did not hesitate to preceed against them.  When he did they gave him wide berth, for he moved with calm, fearless determination.  He was a man of highest courage and keen vision, with a quickness of hearing and a skill in woods craft, exceptional even among pioneers of the forest. It is said he excelled the savage in this respect, on his own ground.  He is credited with being able to walk through the dry leaves and make no perceptible sound.  He could trail an Indian, even in the night and find his way about unerringly without moon or stars to guide him.  An adapt at imitating the birds or other forest sounds.  He could distinquish a Seminole or a Cherokee or a friendly Chicgasaw, as far as he could see him.  In the understanding of the Indians character he excelled all his brothers except John.  David excelled him in Physical strength.  William was hard working, he was neither better nor worse off than the average of his neighbors.  (He was Natty Bumpo.)  He was especially devoted to his family.  He served in the Revolution and was prominent in the campaign against the Indians and one of the leaders of Tipton's faction in the political feud with John Sevier.
    William had taken up a claim, broken sod, improved it by fencing a few acres and set out an orchard while still living at the Fort.  They had many thrilling experiences in those days at the Fort.  One day William and Margaret went out to the claim to gather peaches, as they went through the gate they noticed macosin tracks, also the queer actions of the dog.  Going further they saw Indians dodging from tree to tree, they of course made a hasty retreat, yet William did not fail to put up the bars.  Knowing they could not reach the Fort before the Indians would overtake them they went into a thicket.  Margaret was tripped by a vine and fell with the baby in her arms.  To quite the baby, she quickly gave it the breast, William held the dogs quiet with one hand while he had his hunting knife ready for action in the other.  As he watched, seven Indians passed by, "Huh", he said.  "Had I known there were but 7, I would have let the dogs loose, they could have handled two, I could have taken two or three and the rest would have run."
    Another time when the hostile Indians were maurading in the vicinity, William was off guard, an Indian crept up within range and was preparing to shoot when one of William's dogs discovered his presence and gave warning,
enabling William to dodge behind a tree just in time.
   Williams moved on his land about 1795, residing there until 1808, going first into Logan Co., Ohio and a year later they moved into southern Indiana, living in the fort.
   There were nine children born to William and Margaret: Rover, 1790; William, 1792; James, 1794; Elizabeth, 1796; Nancy Agnes, 1798; Samuel, 1800; Rhoda, 1802; Rebecca, 1805 and Jennie or Janet, Nette born in 1808, all in
Seiver Co., Tenn., on Little Pigeon River.  About 1813, Margaret the wife and mother, passed on.  Elizabeth, the eldest, was married to John Lindsey, June 14, 1814.
   In his book, The Descendents of Robert and Margaret Emmert SHIELDS, A. Randolph SHILEDS has the death date as 1822.

                        From SHIELDS HISTORY, 1980 Pg. 62
   William spent his boyhood in Augusta C. and migrated with his father and mother, Robert and Nancy Stockton Shields to the wilderness of North Carolina, presently Sevier Co., TN.

                        See SHIELDS HISTORY 1980, pg. 63.
   William and several of his brothers migrated to Indiana about 1808. Margaret (Wilson) Shields died 1813 at Madison Ind.  William married (2) 10 Sept 1817 at Logans Fort, Amanda LOGAN, dau. of Ezkiel Logan and a niece  of his first wife.  There was a bitter opposition on the part of his first children to this marriage.Fourth of the Ten Brothers. According to John A. Shields, William settled at Madison, Indiana in 1808 and soon thereafter at Brewersville, where he raised a large family. By his second wife, Amanda Logan, he had a small family. He settled in Washington County, Indiana after marrying Amanda. John A. Shields was his great-grandson.

Judge Littell reports that William's children bitterly opposed his second marriage, which was to his first wife's niece.

John A. Shields says William migrated with the family to Sevier County and, with his father and four of his brothers, preceded the rest of the family, walking from Watauga to the site of Shields Fort, seven miles south of the present city of Sevierville, Tennessee.

William's first wife, Margaret, was from a nearby settlement on the French Broad. They lived in the family fort on Middle Creek for about 10 years, then moved into a cabin of their own nearby. Margaret was a daughter of Samuel Wilson, an early pioneer of East Tennessee, prominent in the campaigns against the Indians and one of the leaders of Tipton's faction in the feud with John Sevier, which had been brought about by political differences and which culminated in the attempt on the part of Sevier to establish the independent State of Franklin.

John A. Shields wrote: "He doubtless had many thrilling experiences. One story concerning him has come down to us. In the early days of the settlement in Tennessee, while the Shields families were still living in Shields Fort, William took up a claim and set out an orchard of fruit trees on part of it. The orchard was a mile or so from the fort. One day, William and his wife, Margaret, went out to the farm to gather peaches. She had the baby along. The orchard was fenced, and soon after they had entered the enclosure, they saw some Indians dodging about among the trees, and also discovered their tracks. They started for home, putting back the bars as they went out. They knew if they were discovered they could not reach the fort before the Indians overtook them, and they had no idea how many there were. So they went into a plum thicket to hide and watch. Just as she was entering the thicket, Margaret caught her foot in a vine and fell, with the baby in her arms. There was moment of awful suspense, but quickly giving it [the baby] her breast, she quieted it. William held the dog with one hand, and in the other hand held a hunting knife poised to kill it instantly if it barked. In those days, every settler had a dog, sometimes several of them, and never ventured into the woods without it. To the watchful sagacity of his dogs, William once owed his life. These dogs hated Indians, and in the forest they would scent one as they scented deer, and having struck the trail of one, they would not be quieted until their warnings were heeded. The Indians also feared them and would often flee before them as from human antagonists. By some chance, the dog had not discovered the presence of the Indians in the orchard. Soon, seven Indians crept out of the enclosure and went their way. 'Huh,' said William jokingly, 'If I had known there were only seven of them, I would have killed five, and the other two would have run, and we could have gathered the peaches.' Though but a legend, and perhaps embellished in the telling, it is still indicative of the times that William and his family endured during the 24 years they lived in what is now eastern Tennessee."

John A. Shields says William and several of his brothers, along with their families, migrated in 1808 to Indiana, which was as wild and unsettled as Tennessee had been a quarter-century earlier. In 1808, only 911 votes were cast in the entire territory. The Shields families crossed the Ohio River at the present site of Mackport, Indiana on a ferry that had been established that year. William helped his brother James build a fort on the present site of Seymour, Indiana, then went to Logan County, Ohio for a year. Returning to Indiana, he settled at Madison and started an orchard. After a brief time at Madison, the family settled near Brewersville in Jennings County. John A. Shields says Magaret, William's first wife, died at Madison in 1813 or 1814 and that in 1817, he married Amanda Logan, sister of Col. E. D. Logan of Washington County, Indiana. They settled on Walnut Ridge, hear Kossuth, Indiana, where William died in 1824 and Amanda in 1826. John A. Shields (who is descended from William and Amanda), confirms that Amanda was the daughter of Margaret Shields' sister.

In Jennings County Order Book 1822-37: Page 30 - 23 September 1823, Lewis L. Scott, assignee of Samuel, Robert and James Shields, of John Lindsey and wife Elizabeth late Shields, of John Davis and wife Rebecca late Shields and Rhoda Shiels, part of the heirs of William Shields, deceased, petition to partition real estate vs. the same as above and Jane, Sarah Ann, Jesse, John Ezekiel Logan Shields and Elizabeth Shields, all heirs of said William. Page 52 - Land is fraction 23 & 24-8-8. Page 55 - States that William Shields in his lifetime did execute a bond to John Winchell for 133 acres, land as stated above, dated 5 August 1821. Commissioners to convey deed. Page 89 - Ezra F. Peabody, as administrator of William Shields estate, petitions to sell real estate as insufficient. Ninety-four acres remaining of the above fractional sections. Page 110 - Lists again the heirs of William and adds Jane, Sarah Ann, John, Jesse and Ezekiel Logan Shields, infant heirs of the deceased. Page 118 - Shows that Stott was appointed guardian of Jane, Sarah, Jesse, John and Ezekiel Logan Shields on 27 March 1826.

John A. Shields in "Three Kansas Pioneer Families--Stalker-Shields-Martin," published May 1949 at Seymour, Indiana, reports the date of William's death as 1826.

Research on the above: "The Shields Family" by John Arthur Shields, 1917; Jennings County, Indiana vital records and newspapers and various Indiana county marriage records (researched by Richard B. Groharing); "Shields Genealogy" by Mary O. Derrick Coleman, edited by Becky Hardin, Mooresville, Indiana, April 1979, published by Fulton County Historical Society, Rochester, Indiana; "The John Tipton Papers," compiled by Glen A. Blackburn, published by The Indiana Historical Bureau, Indianapolis, Indiana, 1942; "Three Kansas Pioneer Families, Stalker-Shields-Martin," by John Arthur Shields, Seymour, Indiana, May 1949 (researched by Francis S. Shields).

Bill Navey gives William Shields' date of death as 24 May 1817 and the place as Washington, Indiana.

After Margaret’s death in 1814, William Shields married Amanda Logan, Sept. 10, 1817.  Their children were Sarah Jane, born June 5, 1818; Jesse, born Sept 20, 1820; Ezekiel. Born May 20, 1822 near Madison, Ind.


William SHIELDS

    Birth information sent by Ron Rasmussen.  See pg. 6 of Shields Gen. by Mary O' Derrick.

   Wm. Shield, 4th son and 5th child of Robert and Nancy Stockton Shields William was born abt. 1768.  A youth of 15 or 16 years when they came to the new home across the mountains into North Carolina.  William is described as having ravan black hair and deep blue eyes, tall, rather slender, lithe and strong.  He was feared by the Indians, yet he did not make it a practice of hunting them down, neither did he have any deeprooted hatred for them as did his nephew John Tipton.  On one occasion he did not hesitate to preceed against them.  When he did they gave him wide berth, for he moved with calm, fearless determination.  He was a man of highest courage and keen vision, with a quickness of hearing and a skill in woods craft, exceptional even among pioneers of the forest. It is said he excelled the savage in this respect, on his own ground.  He is credited with being able to walk through the dry leaves and make no perceptible sound.  He could trail an Indian, even in the night and find his way about unerringly without moon or stars to guide him.  An adapt at imitating the birds or other forest sounds.  He could distinquish a Seminole or a Cherokee or a friendly Chicgasaw, as far as he could see him.  In the understanding of the Indians character he excelled all his brothers except John.  David excelled him in Physical strength.  William was hard working, he was neither better nor worse off than the average of his neighbors.  (He was Natty Bumpo.)  He was especially devoted to his family.  He served in the Revolution and was prominent in the campaign against the Indians and one of the leaders of Tipton's faction in the political feud with John Sevier.
    William had taken up a claim, broken sod, improved it by fencing a few acres and set out an orchard while still living at the Fort.  They had many thrilling experiences in those days at the Fort.  One day William and Margaret went out to the claim to gather peaches, as they went through the gate they noticed macosin tracks, also the queer actions of the dog.  Going further they saw Indians dodging from tree to tree, they of course made a hasty retreat, yet William did not fail to put up the bars.  Knowing they could not reach the Fort before the Indians would overtake them they went into a thicket.  Margaret was tripped by a vine and fell with the baby in her arms.  To quite the baby, she quickly gave it the breast, William held the dogs quiet with one hand while he had his hunting knife ready for action in the other.  As he watched, seven Indians passed by, "Huh", he said.  "Had I known there were but 7, I would have let the dogs loose, they could have handled two, I could have taken two or three and the rest would have run."
    Another time when the hostile Indians were maurading in the vicinity, William was off guard, an Indian crept up within range and was preparing to shoot when one of William's dogs discovered his presence and gave warning,
enabling William to dodge behind a tree just in time.
   Williams moved on his land about 1795, residing there until 1808, going first into Logan Co., Ohio and a year later they moved into southern Indiana, living in the fort.
   There were nine children born to William and Margaret: Rover, 1790; William, 1792; James, 1794; Elizabeth, 1796; Nancy Agnes, 1798; Samuel, 1800; Rhoda, 1802; Rebecca, 1805 and Jennie or Janet, Nette born in 1808, all in
Seiver Co., Tenn., on Little Pigeon River.  About 1813, Margaret the wife and mother, passed on.  Elizabeth, the eldest, was married to John Lindsey, June 14, 1814.
   In his book, The Descendents of Robert and Margaret Emmert SHIELDS, A. Randolph SHILEDS has the death date as 1822.

                        From SHIELDS HISTORY, 1980 Pg. 62
   William spent his boyhood in Augusta C. and migrated with his father and mother, Robert and Nancy Stockton Shields to the wilderness of North Carolina, presently Sevier Co., TN.

                        See SHIELDS HISTORY 1980, pg. 63.
   William and several of his brothers migrated to Indiana about 1808. Margaret (Wilson) Shields died 1813 at Madison Ind.  William married (2) 10 Sept 1817 at Logans Fort, Amanda LOGAN, dau. of Ezkiel Logan and a niece  of his first wife.  There was a bitter opposition on the part of his first children to this marriage.Fourth of the Ten Brothers. According to John A. Shields, William settled at Madison, Indiana in 1808 and soon thereafter at Brewersville, where he raised a large family. By his second wife, Amanda Logan, he had a small family. He settled in Washington County, Indiana after marrying Amanda. John A. Shields was his great-grandson.

Judge Littell reports that William's children bitterly opposed his second marriage, which was to his first wife's niece.

John A. Shields says William migrated with the family to Sevier County and, with his father and four of his brothers, preceded the rest of the family, walking from Watauga to the site of Shields Fort, seven miles south of the present city of Sevierville, Tennessee.

William's first wife, Margaret, was from a nearby settlement on the French Broad. They lived in the family fort on Middle Creek for about 10 years, then moved into a cabin of their own nearby. Margaret was a daughter of Samuel Wilson, an early pioneer of East Tennessee, prominent in the campaigns against the Indians and one of the leaders of Tipton's faction in the feud with John Sevier, which had been brought about by political differences and which culminated in the attempt on the part of Sevier to establish the independent State of Franklin.

John A. Shields wrote: "He doubtless had many thrilling experiences. One story concerning him has come down to us. In the early days of the settlement in Tennessee, while the Shields families were still living in Shields Fort, William took up a claim and set out an orchard of fruit trees on part of it. The orchard was a mile or so from the fort. One day, William and his wife, Margaret, went out to the farm to gather peaches. She had the baby along. The orchard was fenced, and soon after they had entered the enclosure, they saw some Indians dodging about among the trees, and also discovered their tracks. They started for home, putting back the bars as they went out. They knew if they were discovered they could not reach the fort before the Indians overtook them, and they had no idea how many there were. So they went into a plum thicket to hide and watch. Just as she was entering the thicket, Margaret caught her foot in a vine and fell, with the baby in her arms. There was moment of awful suspense, but quickly giving it [the baby] her breast, she quieted it. William held the dog with one hand, and in the other hand held a hunting knife poised to kill it instantly if it barked. In those days, every settler had a dog, sometimes several of them, and never ventured into the woods without it. To the watchful sagacity of his dogs, William once owed his life. These dogs hated Indians, and in the forest they would scent one as they scented deer, and having struck the trail of one, they would not be quieted until their warnings were heeded. The Indians also feared them and would often flee before them as from human antagonists. By some chance, the dog had not discovered the presence of the Indians in the orchard. Soon, seven Indians crept out of the enclosure and went their way. 'Huh,' said William jokingly, 'If I had known there were only seven of them, I would have killed five, and the other two would have run, and we could have gathered the peaches.' Though but a legend, and perhaps embellished in the telling, it is still indicative of the times that William and his family endured during the 24 years they lived in what is now eastern Tennessee."

John A. Shields says William and several of his brothers, along with their families, migrated in 1808 to Indiana, which was as wild and unsettled as Tennessee had been a quarter-century earlier. In 1808, only 911 votes were cast in the entire territory. The Shields families crossed the Ohio River at the present site of Mackport, Indiana on a ferry that had been established that year. William helped his brother James build a fort on the present site of Seymour, Indiana, then went to Logan County, Ohio for a year. Returning to Indiana, he settled at Madison and started an orchard. After a brief time at Madison, the family settled near Brewersville in Jennings County. John A. Shields says Magaret, William's first wife, died at Madison in 1813 or 1814 and that in 1817, he married Amanda Logan, sister of Col. E. D. Logan of Washington County, Indiana. They settled on Walnut Ridge, hear Kossuth, Indiana, where William died in 1824 and Amanda in 1826. John A. Shields (who is descended from William and Amanda), confirms that Amanda was the daughter of Margaret Shields' sister.

In Jennings County Order Book 1822-37: Page 30 - 23 September 1823, Lewis L. Scott, assignee of Samuel, Robert and James Shields, of John Lindsey and wife Elizabeth late Shields, of John Davis and wife Rebecca late Shields and Rhoda Shiels, part of the heirs of William Shields, deceased, petition to partition real estate vs. the same as above and Jane, Sarah Ann, Jesse, John Ezekiel Logan Shields and Elizabeth Shields, all heirs of said William. Page 52 - Land is fraction 23 & 24-8-8. Page 55 - States that William Shields in his lifetime did execute a bond to John Winchell for 133 acres, land as stated above, dated 5 August 1821. Commissioners to convey deed. Page 89 - Ezra F. Peabody, as administrator of William Shields estate, petitions to sell real estate as insufficient. Ninety-four acres remaining of the above fractional sections. Page 110 - Lists again the heirs of William and adds Jane, Sarah Ann, John, Jesse and Ezekiel Logan Shields, infant heirs of the deceased. Page 118 - Shows that Stott was appointed guardian of Jane, Sarah, Jesse, John and Ezekiel Logan Shields on 27 March 1826.

John A. Shields in "Three Kansas Pioneer Families--Stalker-Shields-Martin," published May 1949 at Seymour, Indiana, reports the date of William's death as 1826.

Research on the above: "The Shields Family" by John Arthur Shields, 1917; Jennings County, Indiana vital records and newspapers and various Indiana county marriage records (researched by Richard B. Groharing); "Shields Genealogy" by Mary O. Derrick Coleman, edited by Becky Hardin, Mooresville, Indiana, April 1979, published by Fulton County Historical Society, Rochester, Indiana; "The John Tipton Papers," compiled by Glen A. Blackburn, published by The Indiana Historical Bureau, Indianapolis, Indiana, 1942; "Three Kansas Pioneer Families, Stalker-Shields-Martin," by John Arthur Shields, Seymour, Indiana, May 1949 (researched by Francis S. Shields).

Bill Navey gives William Shields' date of death as 24 May 1817 and the place as Washington, Indiana.

After Margaret’s death in 1814, William Shields married Amanda Logan, Sept. 10, 1817.  Their children were Sarah Jane, born June 5, 1818; Jesse, born Sept 20, 1820; Ezekiel. Born May 20, 1822 near Madison, Ind.


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