Larry Anderson - Families and Individuals

Notes


Tanya Jean LIVINGSTON

D/o William Charles Livingston and Ellen Louise Davis.  Father changed name while in the service from Charles William Thomas, which is still on birth certificate.

  Tanya or Tammy, was someone that I had loved very much for many years and was special friend with her family, brothers and her mother, Ellen since about 1970.  She had been so special to me and had supported me thru impossible times and we had accomplished miracles.  We built our homes out of the wilderness, we had fought against many enemies, we had accomplished miracles in life, in work and put together immense works on family history and touched thousands of lives, for mostly good. I hope.  Together we conquerored and loved, we were greatly successful and admired.
   While still in the Army, just back from Korea we were married in Omaha, Nebraska then went to visit friends and honeymoon to San Antonio, Texas where I had been trained and later taught in the medical courses at Fort Sam Huston, then went into Mexico for a day of some fun.  One fun thing is that we were pulled over coming back from Brownsville, Teas, the cops were natorious for giving tickets along that way, but as the cop was about ready to give a ticket a truck came by and a gust of wind sent his hat flying and rolling along the highway, Tammy laughed and our friends so much, the guy could not write a ticket, just all chuckled and as we told him we were on our honeymoon he bid us luick.  We headed out to my training in Indianapolis, Indiana then, but got caught up in a huge storm along the way, all traffic came to a complete halt, vehicles buried in snow for days, by the time we pulled into Indianapolis the city was buried in snow, but got help form a bishop we called who got us shelter that night and helped find aparment over the next few days.  After graduating from recruting school in top of the class, was sent to Oroville, California where I grew up, was a mixed bag  there, love the place and people I knew but the army was not so hot as the comman was very crooked in their proceedures and I could not deal with that, also the drugs were so bad, became involved in anti drug and gang problems that almost destroyed us, lives threatened as well as a fight with the US Army recruiting command, was very successful in my job but no regrets to leave there, went on to Killeen, Texas, Fort Hood.  By that time I had a major accident, miracle to live and not be completely physically shredded, had multiple operations, etc. and put an end  to my military career, a relief there too, my command I was with and in charge of the medical group, was sent to Iran for an attempted rescue but helecopters collided and all were killed, not sure if I was not supposed to be there too, that was a hard way to get out of the army with that happening.
  Our son, Jonathan was born with a defect called Spina Bifida, we had hoped to have a nice life and go on to finish college in the medical field but with my son's situation had to give up that and lost everything to keep him alive and try to give him a chance to live and develop.  The next 3 years were so hard, had to live in a remote area, no electricity or power of any kind, no running water, etc. but we made it alright and even was able to go to college some, Tammy did pretty well at Snow College and had a thrid child, Sarah while living there. We developed a 12 vold electrical system in the house and powered it by batteries we charged with a car generator on a pole, 1 1/2 inch  black hose on the roof of the old trailer that gave us hot water, had an old Honey storage tank, about 30,000 gallons and that held water for us, we were able to put in a well and finally had indoor toilet when we got a sewage system put in, what a party to burn down the old out house.  Finally the VA got my pension settled and we were able to move to Omaha awhile to get things together again, Susannah and Rebecca were born there, we got into Genealogy very deeply and published the Hiatt books, did quarterly newsletters, etc. and had a famly project to put it all together.  Started a business in printing and genealogy which did very well but took all our time so that was sold, we then moved back to Provo, Utah.
  While in Provo my brother Dale move up with his wife Vickie Baird  and son, Brandon, doing odd jobs there, buying vehicles and fixing up and selling, ran a concession stand at moto cross meets etc. until we bought land around Duchesne, Utah and moved there.  Build our house together.  The house we boughht initially was a prefab 3 story, but in putting it together the movers dropped in from about 8 foot up while I was under it, by a miracle crawled out alive with beams and huge cement blocks all around me, the house destroyed.  We still put it back together, again no electric or running water, etc. for awhile, but together we all build the place, had a nice place and built it up to a large ranchJacob Was born in Rosevelt, Utah while living there.  We were had our horses, lots of river front property all around the house, deer, elk, moose, eagle, bear, etc. all around us.  .  Ended up loosing it over bad deals with dishonest persons but kept family intact. We then moved to Omaha again.
   Jacob got very ill and pronounced dead at the hospital but faith and prayers fooled the doctors, he lived but had to have a track awhile, miracles abounded for him too and he ended up doing very well in spite of predictions and desires of doctors.  Larry Daniel Jr. was born in Omaha,1991.  Tanya had such a hard time so much, she was ill and had a hard time, she died there and I was remarried to Ruth Alo from the Philippines,  we lived in my house in Omaha until we moved to Idaho in 1999 after Tanya had died, thought it a chance to get a new start in a new place and my wife to get her own place and place.  Laura was born there in Omaha before moving, Matthew, Rachel and Charity born in Pocatello, Idaho.


Jacob William Osten ANDERSON

Personal knowledge of Larry and Tanya Anderson.

Jacob William Osten Anderson, born 14 April 1988, Roosevelt, Utah while family lived along the Red Creek near Fruitland on large ranch.  Jacob was born a big boy, nearly 12 pounds,. He was solid, strong and had a heart of gold. The family moved to Omaha, NE when he was just 2, October 1990. He became ill with a cold and was watching televisoin with the Stephanie and Jonathan while mom and dad were doing computer work, Jacob was laying down with his chest and head on ground and his bottom up, Elephant position kids called it but he had flem and gathered so much around his mouth asleep he aspirated it and choked until he wsa blue, so Stepnaie called on dad and I came running up to find him not breathing, started CPR immediately and in short, got him to the hospital.

Jacob did from complications of seizures after 2 days of struggling, beginning 5 PM Sunday, October 9th and pronounced brain dead October 11th 1245.  He donated his organs to others and saved at least 4 lives.

Jacob's last and strongest isntructions to me, dad:
  Dad, don't yell, don't be loud, dad don't be mad at me.  Jacob, always had a huge smile, warm heart and sucha big, big hug, when you died Jacob, the biggest part of my soul went with you. Love dad

I apologize for perhaps an excessively long letter, not sure who to send to so am sending to so many who are cousins, family, friends, perhaps some will appreciate this information and story, have to preserve a little, keeping me busy this first day I have to be alone as all family are gone as of this morning. Larry Anderson

17 Oct 2011
Hi, had our family here this past week at least, that helped or I would have been a basket case. Now all are gone, last left this morning, that is when it gets hard. Kids missed this past entire week of school but do so well anyway they can catch up later.

Jacob was 23, he had seizures most his life but was such a gift. My problem is that I never realized, admitted that there was a chance he would not be here, that he would not just snap out of it, that it was possible for him to die. I have my son Jonathan, now 30, who we struggle with to keep alive, has Spina Bifida, always a fight for his life and strength, but never Jacob. How sad, how many times we hear, never let a moment go by without love and gratitude to have our loved ones.
I had lost Jacob 20 years ago when he was ill and I had to resuscitate and revive him, followed to the hospital and kept him alive, prayed, blessed and demanded his life to continue, even after he was pronounced dead and Catholic priest was there to administer his rights, etc. but I would not accept it only as God's wish but argued with God to leave my son, I would take him back any way I had to. God took me up on that, HE allowed my son's spirit to continue with us for 20 years but he made sure that no evil would have power over Jacob, he was kept that child forever and as spoken so plainly, Let the little children go to Him and woe unto anyone who damages the child, for such is the Kingdom of Heaven. Jacob is really fit for the Kingdom of Heaven and the angel in our midst we did not appreciate until gone, then his spirit was fully revealed plainly. I must thank God that He allowed my son to continue with us for these 20 years, even though I would beg and demand another 20, it was not mine this time to say, it is decided for the good of all that Jacob has now a higher calling eternally.
Jacob was simple, he loved, wanted only simple things, to be included, to talk to someone, to have a friend, to do things outdoors, he loved the mountains, to shoot, hunt, fish, camp or anything that could allow him to be with others, especially a friend. He tried to do everything but could do so little in so many ways. He was so determined and you know the testimonials bore at his funeral were so helpful, so many others loved my son and appreciated him, miss him too. He always greeted me, always said good morning, always liked a hug and he always smiled. How I miss that now and to expect him home. He started work at a handicap business, was proud he could earn some money. He could not watch any movies, he could not have any type of electronic screen or would cause seizures but he could watch a movie at the theater. He loved to even play a board game, play basketball and loved soccer as a kid, he always wanted to play again but of course he out grew that when it became competitive. He played basketball with his church and did pretty well, was surprised and so pleased for him when he really could shoot and make a basket, he did very well. It was only a week or so ago the kids were out shooting basket and he could outdo all of us.

Jacob was a real lesson to all who was with him. He did some things pretty annoying, even destructive but really never had a complete understanding of it. It was only a couple weeks ago he got mad at Ruth, step mom, he keyed her van pretty bad. Of course she was so upset as I and howled at him, Jacob, Jacob, what did you do. He was sitting on the couch in the house, of course he knew he was wrong but when I saw him on the couch and rather loudly said, Jacob, what did you do, why did you do that? He said, Dad, don't yell, don't be loud. Jacob, what did you do, do you know what you did, that will cost us so much to fix! Don't yell dad, don't be mad. What could I do? For a long time I struggled to put his actions and thoughts to reason, it was hard, I knew there was a problem but he could also understand and often was quite alert and bright but then was told, Just think of Jacob as a child between 6 and 8, that really put it all in perspective. I could see a little boy and how he acted, it put it all in a way to understand and deal with, how could I be mad at Jacob. My older brother, Tom Casey, who was here for the funeral with his son, told me Jacob called him, as he often does and likes to call others when troubled. Well he answered and said to Tom, I'm in trouble. Tom, What's up Jake? Ruth is mad at me. Tom, Why? What did you do, nothing he said. Then Tom got him to talk, said dad yelled at him and mom mad, when Tom got that he had done something, this time keyed the van, Tom asked him if he was sorry, sort of, but to apologize, did not want to, finally Tom talked and got him to understand enough and Jacob did come to apologize. It was not possible to be mad or stay mad at Jacob. If there is anything I have to remember and cherish, Jacob held no grudge, remembered no wrong, loved everyone and loved friend and family. He never liked conflict, never liked meanness or anger. Once I could place that great big 260 pound boy into the frame of thought as my little 6 or 8 year old boy, I completely understood and appreciated him.

Jacob loved to hunt and we had planned this years hunt for many months and he asked incessantly of it for the past few weeks. He was going to teach his younger sister and brother to hunt. We got out the tents, guns, clothes, etc. he packed his bags, prepared for this. He was so excited and smiling of this chance. We got the tags and licenses, had clothing, boots, guns, everything getting ready. I spent all we had just to get these things, even a new gun with a scope, his gun was my old cut A-3-03, 30-06 and he was a really good shot and loved to go shooting. Saturday afternoon we went shooting to make last preparations for going out Monday early morning with the season's opening of deer season. Jacob did very well, had an excellent half dollar size pattern at 25 yards and then at 100 hit a good pattern but then said he was not feeling well and went to the truck where he had a seizure just as he opened the door. I thought little of it, made him comfortable and waited for him to wake up to get in the truck, he took just awhile but use to it, maybe a little longer then normal. Then went to a birthday party for a friend of the family, he was a little drowsy but normal, had his cake and ice cream and dinner but got home late, he was tired and just went to bed, when he was tired he just went to bed. In the morning I went with the rest of the family to church, Jon and Jacob went to a later session with young adults. So I came home after Sacrament Meeting, Jacob was sitting on the couch, looking perfectly handsome, all cleaned, shaved, suit and tie with bible in hand and his huge trademark smile. Asked him, YOU OK, Jacob. Yes. Get your medicines, YES, feel okay, yes, I feel fine, he said. BUT Jonathan was late, their friend coming to get them, so had to hurry Jon and get him going. They were late, so got Jonathan upstairs and Jacob grabbed his chair and took him out quick. I did not get to hug him, Jacob never hesitated to give me a hug. Just looked fine. About 45 minutes later I had a call to get him cause he had a seizure at church, That was nothing really odd, so just went to get him, he was walking, they said it maybe took longer for him to come out of it. BUT it seemed still normal, he had so many in his life, so use to it. But he walked to the truck with me, was groggy but normal. We got home, said he was fine but wanted to change and get ready for hunting the next morning. I should have put him on the couch upstairs where I could watch him but had a headache myself and I went to lie down until Ruth and kids got home a few minutes later, Jacob appeared doing fine, was changed and busy. Did not check for awhile, when I did, he was laying down following another seizure asleep, as normal. I made him comfortable but could not get him into bed as he was so heavy to lift Waited for him to wake up and get him his medicine but accepted it was just like any other time. He stayed asleep way too long, I should have paid attention but kids, noise and getting things ready for the morning hunt, just let it slip until checking on him later Ruth's brother in law, Tom Hendrix said he was still sleeping but then a minute later yelled to run down, he had stopped breathing, we started immediate CPR but it took ober 25 minutes for the ambulance to get there, then they took another 15 minutes or more to get him onto a machine then to the ambulance. I even had to ask them to put on siren and hurry to the hospital, they were going so slow but then agreed and sped on but it was an hour from the first CPR to the hospital and it was just too long. Jacob had suffered too much brain damage and never recovered.

I would not of course, accept any other alternative then to take my son home but knew inside he was gone already. I kept the full 72 hours to prove it out the best I could. Tues. 11th Oct 2011, Jacob was declared brain dead. I spoke with the organ donation team and agreed to allow Jacob to donate life to others. If I have to loose my beloved son as this, perhaps by his donations his spirit will live on and his smile shine in others. The team from Utah was there and kept his body vital, I asked for time for my kids to all get there to see him and it worked out well that way, The sisters and their families all arrived by WE night and by Thursday all were there to help me through this, we had some very special times those last moments together. By 3 PM Thursday they took Jacob to the Operating room and they were still working with him past 10 PM.

There were so many friends that came by, that were at his viewing and funeral, I was so pleased to see he had so many friends and influence for good, all testified of his spirit, his smile and complete nature of innocence and love, simplicity to enjoy the moment, the friend and never remember anger or hurt. Jacob loved everyone, especially his family. He loved his brothers and sisters, all of them and always spoke of Larry Daniel who is on his mission for the LDS Church. I have been, sadly enough, to many funerals but for Jacob, have never been to a more caring, sharing testimonial, unusual maybe but so beautiful, there were several who came forward to testify of their experiences with Jacob, and for that I am so grateful. There are always the cliches, better off, happy where he is, etc. ALL SO VERY TRUE, but for all who loose a loved one, it is not the loved one now in a bad way, it is the loved ones left behind. I can say how badly I miss him, miss that smile and greeting and I realize that I can never pass a loved one again without saying my last good bye and have that last long hug.

I found a letter he was apparently working on when he died, perhaps even the last moments. I also found he seemed to be trying to hang up his Halloween costume, he loved Halloween and the kids trick or treating. It was a black cape, gloves, he sure loved to play along with the kids on Halloween, so many stories to tell and his simple joy and love of everything. I will include this letter because it was Jacob. He knew his friends were growing, getting married, having families. He had a friends announcement of marriage taped to the wall next to his bed, he was excited he was invited. So he thought of those things hoping someday to find love and completeness. He had a special friend in the Philippines, Wendy Llanera, who was so sweet to him, helped and never was afraid of his seizures, even if she did not consider marriage with him she called him her brother and loved him as such, Jacob bragged of his Filipina girlfriend and she could say she had her special friend, so many thanks for that opportunity, innocent and loving.

Dear Daughter, (Wendy Llanera) so sorry too, Jacob was taken in today, Thursday, 3 PM for operation, they will take parts for others to live, so far at least 4 will be given life by Jacob. It is so hard Wendy, can't believe it either, just in a daze that has not yet fully hit. He talked of important people the last couple of days, he asked about his brother on a mission, he asked about sisters, he asked about you. It just feels so terrible now I can't give him a hug or see that huge smile and share with everyone. Can write more of it later. Got home and went to his room tried to figure out more why, I found where he fell and seems to have hit his head on a wall and dented it, maybe what caused such a different situation. Then I found some letters he was writing, to you. I will type it out for you as he had it, did not seem to finish it. He writes:
9 October 2011

Hy Wendy, how is it going? I'm doing fine, I have been thinking of if there would be a time of day we can get together to do something, have some fun together. go off some where together. Get to know each other telling each other about ourselves. Where we would like to live, what we would like to have in our house.
Somewhere where I would like to live is in California up in the mountains where we can shoot guns, hunt and fish.
Something we, I would like to do there for fun is drive some four wheelers, climb mountains, and go to Disney World.
As I am not in Idaho, for me deer season is up and I am getting ready to go hunting. I would also like to do some camping and fishing. ------

Then he wrote about a house he was looking at to offer you.
2022 Pebble Lane
5 Bedrooms
3.5 baths
More then 5,000 square feet
3.4 acres
Coreten Siding with 80 year warranty
Viking Appliances
Music Room
2 Way propane stone fireplace
Walk out basement
Rinna: on Demand water heater
State of the art water treatment system
Custom detailing in every room

Sublime Mountain Living Surround yourself in a natural beauty in this distinctive custom home, situated just below Pebble Creek Ski area. This stunning home features exotic granite, including blue louise slab, exotic granite hanging as wall art. Mahogany cabinets, slate floor, Brazilian Cherry Wood floor and custom metal stairway with railings throughout. Large picture window and both common and private decks are all designed to capture spectacular views from nearly every room. Enjoy easy access to skiing mountain, biking and hiking. A seasonal stream that runs throughout this entire amazing property.

He wrote also, I want to see the movies Zoo Keeper and Super 8;
Jacob

In a message dated 10/14/2011 9:29:55 A.M. Mountain Daylight Time, curlymay@sbcglobal.net writes:

TEAR DROPS

They say memories are golden, Well, maybe that is true; I never wanted memories, I only wanted you.
A million times I needed you, A million times I cried; If love alone could have saved you, You never would have died.
In life I loved you dearly, In death I love you still; In my heart you hold a piece No one could ever fill.
But now I know you want me To mourn for you no more, To remember the happy times Life still has much in store. Since you'll never be forgotten I pledge to you today; A hallowed place within my heart Is where you'll always stay.
If tears could build a stairway And heartache make a lane; I'd walk the path to heaven And bring you back again.
Our family chain is broken, and nothing seems the same; But as God calls us one by one, The chain will link again.

Testimonial of Jacob  15 October 2011

Dear Peggy, ever wonder why someone comes into contact with another at some point in their lives. You have freshly entered my circle of friends but in reality, in many ways, you are the most able to share and understand. I feel for your family and sadly say I know your pain, as you mine. I understand the seizures and constant fear, taking a bath, falling and hitting their head, dying in sleep, any number of fears.

I see now how blessed we were, that the trials of Jacob were trials from an angel to teach and direct all of us and all who came in contact, so many, was so surprised to see the chapel filled and there was a testimonial where people came forward to share, so many and those stories of inter relationships with my son were so warm and comforting.
I attended my church Sunday morning but was going home and ready to just cry and hide, my families had all just left for home. After the meeting our Stake President, a leader of our church came to me to invite me to talk to him about an hour. I wondered what he had to say, but it was good so I was not alone waiting for the rest of the family. As I went with him he explained to me that the church had an inter denominational relationship with others and had worked together for a long time to share and encourage understanding and co operation in common faith of Jesus Christ. He told me that our church was helping a new church, a black Pentecostal church that was starting out renewing an old building. We got there early, our church was giving this church a check to pay for the drive way, others of our faith was giving other items including a hand carved marble statue of a family in a circle with a child praying. We entered by 11 and were greeted with plenty of song and dance. I recall attending the Pentecostal as a child as well as many other faith churches. But it was sure active and full of praises regardless of my personal sharing of principles in differences. We attended thru near the entire meeting of near one and half hour, after sharing song and messages, we were given a challenge to walk about and greet and shake hands, etc. of all others in the congregation. Following the sharing of faith and friendship there was a young black lady, late teens or early 20, she asked to present a testimonial and went forward and spoke. She had failing kidneys and liver. On Wednesday she received an urgent call to get a ride to SLC ready for organ donations, she had a hard time finding some to take her and find others to care for family. She said she got there and went thru rigorous questions and tests expecting this miracle BUT turned out she was rejected at the last moment because she had some infection or problem with her liver so she could not be given the transplant. She rejoiced in her life and opportunity and that someone else had life even if not hers. There was an out cry of praise and song for her. BUT FOR ME I KNEW, IT WAS JACOB, there was no other that time, the surgical team from SLC flew into Pocatello and I was told already people were lined up waiting. They were ready to take Jacob to Surgery WE night but I asked them to wait till my families arrived and hold till Thurs morning, they did and even until 3 PM Thursday. We were only told that they were still working with Jacob past 9 or 10 PM.

Following the young ladies testimonial I nearly had a melt down, I knew it was Jacob she was talking about and thought what a world, here I am, no one knew or planned or said a word. No one knew who I was nor her situation. Following that the minister asked our group to come forward to present the gifts, etc. My stake president spoke first saying very kind words and then told them of who I was, it was out pouring with thanks and praise. After others spoke, I stood back because it was not my program or anything to do with myself, but the minister, an aged black lady, motioned for me to speak too. That was so hard, but what could I do, say no after the words and praises of others for all God's works. So I thanked them and spoke a few words. First, I said I thought I had a daughter in that congregation for a few minutes but also thanked them for the spirit, for the joy, for the words which no Christian of any faith could reject, there were no contrary words, no contrary doctrine, only of Jesus Christ and of faith, of hope and of standing for God. I then referred to the thing I knew a little of, I am retired from the Army Medical command. Our medical group was the center of importance, as in all centers any relevance, you must protect your front and rear and flanks, you must have strength and determination to protect the center. SO I asked everyone, who were soldiers of course we all are, and who is the center, of the Universe of the world and of our lives? A little hesitation and they all shouted Jesus Christ, yes, of course that is what I referred to. And as I said the Center must be protected, so in this world and life there are all sorts, all forms, all cultures and faiths but all have one common center, that of Jesus Christ and we all must stand, some on one side or other of that Center, some from various cultures and faiths but Jesus is the Center of us all, and we are there together. That is what I felt with this group and am grateful for their faith that can effect all of us and all should have a faith and purpose every day. Well, that is all I could say and thanked them. On the way out, I was the last and the members came to the center to shake my hands and encourage, I appreciated their spirit, no one could miss the joy in that. Then the young lady spoke and hugged me and in that embrace told me, Even though I did not receive your son's organs, there were at least a dozen others standing by, the very next person eligible for those organs and others were all blessed and life given to them.
I could not ever have believed this possible, no thought, no plan, no idea who these people were, never saw and probably never see again, but this had to be the Lord's answer to my prayer that somehow I knew Jacob's life was precious to another and his spirit lives on in others. This I saw and thank God for taking that special opportunity to speak to me in such a manner. It was such a shock also to those I was with, no one had any idea of it. MY stake president on the way home said to me that he had a very strong feeling of spirit to go to me and take me with him for this event. I have never been close or really friends with him before, he had been with me several times during this situation with Jacob but this was a revelation to him too. Thanks for all the thoughts and prayers, it is not lost. Affectionately and sincerely, Larry Anderson

Life Legacy
POCATELLO - Jacob William Osten Anderson, born April 14, 1988, Roosevelt, Utah, died October 13, 2011, Pocatello, Idaho. Preceded in death by: Mother, Tanya Livingston-Anderson, grandparents, Glen and Ruby Hiatt-Anderson and William Livingston. Survived by: Father, Larry Anderson, stepmother, Ruth Alo-Anderson; and siblings: Stephanie and Ron Clement - four children, Jonathan, Sarah and Matt Schaeffer - one child, Susannah Hallowell - one child, Rebecca and Matthew Kelly - two children, Larry-Daniel, Laura, Matthew, Rachel and Charity; grandmother, Ellen Livingston. Jacob suffered most of his life with seizures and unexpectedly passed at the age of 23. Jacob had a very child-like love for everyone and everything. He loved anyone to do simple and small things with. His joys were his family and friends, playing the guitar, going to movies skiing, playing board games, hunting and camping. He was a loved son, brother, uncle, nephew, grandson and friend. He was loved by all and will be missed. You are invited to share condolences. The viewing will be held October 14, 6 to 8 p.m., at the Wilks Funeral Home, 211 W Chubbuck Road. The funeral will be held Saturday, October 15, 11 a.m., at the LDS Church on the corner of Philbin and Siphon. Due to the unexpected death a memorial fund has been set up at Zions Bank. Please take a moment to share your condolences a photo or any stories you have of Jacob with the Anderson family. Service information appears under the "Service Schedule" tab above. Born: April 14, 1988
Place of Birth: Roosevelt, UT
Death: October 11, 2011
Place of Death: Pocatello, ID
Wilks Funeral Home

Guestbook
10/13/2011 - Tony & Susan Satchwell
Our prayers are with you at this sorrowful time. We love you all. Love, The Satchwells

10/27/2011 - Saeid Rezaii
Larry, Ruth and Family, We are deeply sorry to hear about Jacob's passing. He will be greatly missed. We pray that your wonderful memories of him will help you through this very difficult time. Sincerely, Saeid and Ellice Rezaii

11/06/2011 - Janet
So sorry to hear the sad news about Jacob. Losing a child leaves a deep and lasting wound! But, remembering all the wonderful times you shared can help to comfort you always. And at times like this, may the God of Love sustain you with His promise of Hope. "He will wipe out every tear from their eyes and death will be no more, neither will mourning nor outcry nor pain be anymore. The former things have passed away." Revelation 21:4

1 June 2013
I have kept Jacob's room as it was the day he died, once in awhile I can visit, see and remember my son Jacob, the hardest thing of moving now is that his room has to be taken down, his last place he  touched on earth will be gone.

Found a letter today, cleaning out his room as we are planning to move, his precious things, his secret things, his fun and dreams.  There was only innocence and sweetness in all he had.

This is a story he wrote, so far did not find another page, seems he must have had another page to it but his dreams!!
Jacob William Anderson

Sep 8-9 2010
    I have had a dream that when I have gotten a car I have seen a Jiant rock dog so I have gotten that jiant rock dog with that car, so I brot them home wiht me at my house, after I brot them to my house I have gon in my house, a few hours after I have been in my house I have went outside in that car of mine and went to the mountains with that jiant rock dog, when I got to the moutains I got out of the car & have started to put my tent up and I also have had friends with me, those friends I had with me are all of those that is in the tenth ward after tehy ahve put their tent and campiong trailer up we saw taht car of mine transform to a jiant roabot and that hiant rock dog have came alive, after that we have gotten surprised, A cupple hours later a cupple of the others got on that transformer and then they started to run all around the moutains as we have been on them -----


ANDERSON

Child was a miscarriage.


Marie De Board ANDERSON

   Personal knowledge of Larry and Tanya Anderson.  There was very hard feelings at the time of the birth and subsequently, still birth - of this daughter.  The baby was 5 months along but is reportedly to have died because of cord strangulation and delivered dead.  To this day I do not know where she is buried other then in downtown Omaha, NE. Tanya called the baby Mary Catherine Anderson.


Glenn Woodrow ANDERSON

   Personal Knownledge.  Glenn served as a shipbuilder in S.F. during the early years of WWII, he took a job as a Merchant Marine and was at sea in a ship with only a machine gun for armament.  He told me once that a submarine pulled up along them once but it was luckily one of their own.
   Glenn never went through High School yet he was very well learned and loved to argue anything which came up.  He told me his phylosophy in life as far as getting a job was to apply for whatever position he desired, if he did not know a thing about the job he would tell them he was an expert, then when hired he would find out who the best person was at the job and go to them and explain that he was desperate to have the job but knew nothing.  He would ask if he could work along side the person and within a few days would really be an expert at about anything he ever tried.  That is how he got into ship building as well as an electrician.
   Glenn worked on many projects, such as the major Dam project of the
Missouri River in S.D. out of Pierre in the late 40's and early 50's.  He also worked on the massive Calif. project out of Oroville, Calif. and installed generators and their systems up and down the Feather River. He was very respected by those who worked with him.
   Glenn and at least some of his brothers also worked in the mines of Colorado and Utah.  He and Gerald had some investment in some mines and Gerald got him into some Oil well deals.  He could surely have told a lot of stories for us and always was going to do it but never did get around to it.
   As a young man he and all the brothers and sisters had to work hard on the farms.  It was common for them to milk several cows and do many chores before they could go to school.
   He loved country music, especially the old country.  He wrote poetry, sang and could play the harmonica quite well, I also remember he played the guitar some.  He would always like to sing silly songs to tease mom.  As kids we loved to hear him sing and be a little silly.
   He wrote a lot of things in letters towards the end, when he knew he was dying, trying to figure life out.  He worried aobut his wife and children, all of them, including step children.  An example he wrote:
  ..."For instance, you or no one can tell what I am saying unless you knew
me.  I am not a common person to know.  Sometimes it is easy to express your
feelings.  Right now I am crying inside of me.  Can I make things any plainer?  I am tired and lonesome.  Ruby, tell everyone hi for me.  My thoughts & mind is running out of words.  So here is a card.  I love you always, Glen
    Tell everyone hellow for me.  Hope your mother is well.  Don't forget Suzie & Chuckie or the rest either.      Love to all   Glenn"

   He always liked to express his mind, and to challenge himself and others.
What he did not know he liked to find out.  If you tried to argue with him, he loved it, but you had better have your facts correct, he would, and he always had an Almanac with him to prove the most off the wall facts.
   He loved animals, was as good a vet as any I have seen.  He could calm the most wild horse.  He was an excellent horseman and excellent judge of animals.  He knew the best of horses and cattle.  We had excellent stock as kids.
   He loved the Lord and knew the scriptures.  Although he was not very active at attending church, he was a strong believer and defended his beliefs.  He did not like to go to the meetings and cough so much that it disrupted the meetings.  He would make us all learn the Beatitudes and Ten Commandments.
   He smoked and was an alcoholic which caused him some difficulty for a number of years, but he quit smoking and drinking but not until his health was ruined.  The work in the mines combined with smoking and his allergies, he had asthma and bronchitus, finally destroyed his lungs, which developed enphasyma.
   Glenn never turned away from the troubles of any of his kids.  He could always find any of us, including Dale who was at times very difficult to locate in the various places he lived.
    His last plea was that we could take care of his wife, our mother.  He also wanted to be buried in the Ozawkie Cem. with his mother, father, grandparents and other family members but we never got him there.  As he knew he was never returning home from his last stay in the hospital, he wept because he said his grandchildren whom he loved would never remember him.  He loved them all.  He loved to tease them, especially Jonathan Glenn who was crippled but who would love to play with squirt guns.  His grandpa would hide from him then pop out and squirt him.  They had a ball.  His big wish was that he could see his grandchildren grow up and that they would remember him.  I know that he was anxious to also see his family who had preceeded him.  He was always loving of his own brothers and sisters and I had never heard him speak ill of a single one of them at any time.  He loved to see them, he never excluded the half brothers and sisters and never spoke of them as anything less than his brothers and sisters.
   His message to his grandchildren was not to waste their life with stupid mistakes, face challenges with determination and love of the Lord.  Love the Lord, read the scriptures and serve God with all your mind, might and strength.
    Glenn, my father, loved his families and was anxious for me to do the Anderson side of the genealogy for him.  I was only sorry that he did not see how far we did get.  He would be so excited to share in what we have done.  I
am sure he has a part in this on the other side of the veil.  As it is my turn to cross the veil I know he will be the first to greet me, and all those of his family.  His strength of family was most important to him and to honor all the family, never turn away a brother, sister, cousin or other member when we are able to assist one another.
   My father was a most wonderful person whom we all loved and respected very much.  We would never want to dishonor him or his memory in any way.  He tried to teach us all principals to live by and to be examples to our children.  He was full of feelings that he was not able to express, full of love that he did not know how to show.  He was an honest and hard working person.  He never went past the 8th grade, yet he had a philosophy of work, "Tell them you can do whatever it is they are asking for, then start to work by getting next to the best person at the job available and pay attention to them.  Soon you will also be a master at the job.  That worked for him.
   His pain in life was that few people ever tried to understand him, including his family.  He loved the out of doors and was a free spirit, he loved all out door sports, he loved to hund, fish, camp, hike and anything else he could spend time doing out of doors.
   He was an excellent shot.  One day not long before he passed away, a few of us went to our back yard and put a dime in a tree about 50 feet away.  He was weak and had a difficult time waling far and breathed hard, but as several of us kids tried to nail the target, got very close but missed the mark.  He steadied himself and in a single shot sent the dime flying, he could plug it every time.  He was the best shot I have ever seen, and that has been quite a challenge.
   He was always an adventurer, never liked to settle down for long.  He loved to travel, to see and do new things.   When he was unable to do anything as he was so ill and out of breath, he lost purpose in life.  But when his father asked him for help, (Art lived in Kansas) he went right there, he was there to help his father just the weekend before he went into the hospital the last time.  He would expect us to do the same for each other.

                            'Sonny' Back Home
           Gelding, 'Rustler' Victim, Finally Restored To Owner
LONG SERCH ENDED: Sonny, the prize winning stolen gelding,w as back home yesterday with his owner, Glenn Anderson, after having been "rustled" by horse thieves early last month.  Anderson, of 1527 14th St., Thermalito, (Oroville, Calif.) had never ceased his search for the missing animal, which finally turned up on Table Mountain.  The "rustlers" never have been caught.

   Glen Anderson's prize winning gelding, Sonny, missing since "rusters" cut through 16 fences early in November to steal the animal and touch off a posse type search by 12 Oroville area horsemen, was back in his Thermalito home
stable today.
   Anderson, of 1527 14th St., said his valued gelding was discovered by Lew Cooper of Table Mountain Ranch when the latter turned a herd of cattle loose on the mountain to feed.
   Sonny's owner was summoned and the horse was ridden to a road from where Anderson took him home by trailer.
   "I'm sure glad to get him back," the relieved owner said.  "I hadn't given up the search.  In fact I'd been looking for him just about every day since."
    Anderson said Sonny is "in good shape except his feet are a little tender."
   Meantime, sheriff's deputies had turned up no clue as to the "rustlers' who spirited the gelding away early last month.
   The quickly organized "posse" on Nov. 8th made a fruitless search for the stolen horse in the Oregon Gulch, Yankee Hill, and Jarbo Gap country.
   The posse which so valiently gave pursuit in the seeking to track down the thieves and the missing gelding was led by the deputy sheriff Leroy Woods.  They followed a twisting, turning trail that led from Anderson's pasture into the countryside.
   All the ranchers and landowners in the area also were also alerted to keep their eyes open for traces of the missing horse.
   As for Sonny, he neighed his satisfaction today at being back at his home stamping grounds and being fed special goodies to make up for his time in the wilderness.

Between exchane of letters of another cousin, Lorraine Hyatt Mayes, we compared notes and surely shared lives and times of families with my parents. Larry Anderson  She is a cousin thru the Hiatt/Hyatt but have not proved her connections but her stories are part of the history of that time and would be shared with my father so well.  My father was an excellent shot all his life, even to the week before he died he was out side the porch in Omaha and we put a dime in a tree in the back yard, houses all around and behind us, but we shot at that dime. Dale would hit and nick it as would I, send it flying, some had a good solid hit but most were corners out of it, then dad shot and nailed it dead center every time and breathing so bad with his emphasyma.  Still his shots were miraculous to us as kids, he would hit a running deer over a hundred yards and shot one that was clear across a canyon dropped immediately about 1/4 mile away.  SO the story of Lorraine here would be so fun compared to him and like to keep such stories of those of that same time.  SInce dad lived and worked in Leadville, Colorado as well as Cripple Creek, these stories are as it was of his own life he would tell us.  Larry

MY TARGET PRACTICE PAYED OFF
Living in Leadville, Colorado in the 1930’s was still a time when there was a need to hunt animals as part of the way a family provided food for their family. Our family was one of these families and each of us three children took our turn at learning how to hunt and kill certain kinds of animals needed for our own table.
My sister Lovenia being the oldest was the first child taught about these duties. But Lovenia just could not take it upon herself to kill anything and refused to even hold the rifle. On the other hand my brother Albert Jr. could hardly wait for his turn to learn how to put food on the table for us. When it came my turn to learn dad was working so much overtime that he did not have much time to train me and left it up to my brother to teach me.
I was only eight years old and Jr. was 10 years of age. Jr. had a 22 rifle that dad had given him and this is the rifle that I learned how to shoot with. We would walk out to the nearby woods and target practice as often as we could. Because the rifle was just too heavy for me to hold up and get a steady aim at the target, Jr. would place the barrel of the gun on his shoulder and then he explained how to center the tip of the gun and get a good site with one eye on the target then gently pull the trigger. It did not take me long to learn how to do this and soon I was laying on the ground on my belly with the rifle barrel resting on a rock, or I would rest the barrel of the gun on a tree limb.
After awhile I shot and killed my first rabbit and when we got home my brother taught me how to skin the rabbit so that no hair touched the skin and contaminate it. He then would take the hide and scrape all the flesh and fat from the skin rub it with salt and stretch it out on a wooden frame to let it dry out. Once the hide was all dried out he would rub salt into it with his fingers to soften the skin into leather. This could take days or weeks to make it soft enough and pliable. He then would make coin purse’s, hand bags, hats, belts and etc out of the fur hide and sell them to people all over town.
We had a carnival every year that came to town and they had a booth with a big round target and if you could shoot in the center with all six shots you would win a big prize. I was 10 years old now and had been shooting for two years and I thought I was pretty good, but I knew my brother was better wish he were here.
Oh! How I wanted one of those prizes, but I did not have any money to try. I was standing and watching everyone try and all the while I was there watching no one won the big prize the Ukulele.
As I was watching the Chief of Police came and stood beside me. He asked me if I would like to try, I said “OH! yes but I do not have any money.” He then took my hand and we walked over to the man in charge and purchased tickets so that we both could try at the same time. He then said to me “If you beat me I will buy you an ice cream.”
Well that just did it; I just had to hit the center of the target more times than he did. I wanted some ice cream and I hadn’t had any store bought ice cream in several years. We always had our own kind of ice cream made from snow with a little sugar and canned milk and only in the winter and it was now summer.
As I stood there looking at the rifle it was different from my brothers so I asked how to shoot it. The man at the booth explained what to do and it really wasn’t different it just looked different that’s all.
So I stood trying not to shake and to get a good bead on the center of the target before I pulled the trigger. Finally I got up enough nerve to pull the trigger. “WOW! I hit the center and then so did the Chief of Police. I hit the center again and again and so did the Chief of Police. The excitement of everyone that began to gather behind us was over whelming. Finally our last shot and as I stood there the anticipation began to get to me, but one look at the Ukulele, I then calmed down, pulled the trigger and I jumped with joy I had hit the center with all six shots, I had won the Ukulele.
I then waited quietly for the Chief of Police to take his last shot; I though he was taking forever to pull the trigger then all of a sudden bang and he just missed the center. WOW! I beat the Chief of Police in a shooting match and I was only ten years of age.
He did just as he said he would do he bought me an ice cream and from that day forward when I was in town and saw him I would run as fast as I could up to him just to say hello to my friend.
At that time I was sure that I was better at shooting than our own Chief of Police. I used to brag about the day I beat the Chief of Police at shooting. But as I matured I had my doubts that I could have been better than the Chief of Police. I feel now he missed the center of the target just to make a young girl happy and I now know that is just what he must have done.

My father owned a gold mine here in California in the San Bernardino Mountains at one time. He worked in the mine alone for about 10 years. There was only a small vein of gold in the mine but it was selling at a good price for those days of
$35.00 an oz. He was taking out about $500.00 to $700.00 for a months work when he worked it.
Then one of the times that he left the mine and drove down to visit my mother and the rest of the family for a week someone blew up his mine with all his ore cars, equipment and etc. He was broken hearted about it and never worked it again.
He had many offers to purchase the land and cabin but dad believed that one of the people that wanted his land could have been the one that blew up his mine. So he rented a bulldozer and moved dirt and rocks down the hill and over the original opening to the mine. Many years later after the rains had washed all the traces of his mine away he sold the land and moved to Utah with my brother on his cattle ranch. I bought the small ranch next to my brother and moved dad and mom on that land where they lived the rest of their lives.
Lorraine
It is a small world and I would bet my dad at least, knew your family, he seemed to know everyone in that area and visited there, last I remember we stopped to see some of his mining buddies in Colorado about 1962. Where is Cripple Creek compared to Leadville? I do remember him talking of both those places. He also did mine in Calif and took us to places there he use to work, the 1930's and 40's, Placerville, Hangtown, Rough and Ready, Grassvalley and other such places. Use to be quite a tour, took us to Hangtown and another, oh yes, Camptown where the old song was written. He seemed to know everywhere but today I tried to follow those places and could not find them, about 2 years ago could not find even the highway, the old Summit to Reno was gone too, we use to go there to put chains on vehicles during a winter storm. When the show would start to fall, many of the cousins and uncles would grab a bunch of chains from the local stores and run there to set up and put chains on for vehicles that could not go thru the summit without them, Donners Summit it was, sorry. Been a long time I guess, does not seem like it but that had to be about 1958-62 time too. We use to go a lot of places all gone now, Feather River destroyed along with the old ghost towns, old highways gone, new freeway systems cut off and abandoned the old stage coach roads. So few left but then I could never go back to California to live, even a visit is hard, seeing what has become of it, such sick and sad radical people destroyed everything so beautiful, northern California at least, was the most beautiful place in the world, but the later 60's and 70's ended that now there is not even a memory of most the places. I did go thru some of the old places, see some scars of what I knew and I know that behind some of the closed access roads, etc. are places that I knew so well as a child. Same as in Colorado, all gone, the old towns and places are taken over and closed off by big interest mines that grabbed everything and put guards around the entrance or access roads.
Thanks, so many memories that I had forgotten. Wish so much my father would have written his stories he had promised, a long lost era and you remind me so much of those days, my dad was born 1916, my mom in 1915, nothing seems so long ago until you see what has happened in these few years that erased all signs and memories of those times so fast forgotten. Thanks, Larry Anderson


Ruby Pearl HIATT

   Ruby Pearl Hiatt, married James Thomas Casey and moved to California where many of her family, aunts and uncles, had moved years before.  He worked as a fireman but caught TB and died.  Ruby met Glenn during the war and they were married in San Francisco.  She had always thought San Francisco was a beautiful place and loved the ocean.
   As a family we would move around a lot, at first following the War they had to find work and often that was working in the farm fields.  Glenn also worked in mines in Colorado and Southern Utah.  He was an electrician and that was his main occupation and as he got work thru the unions he went to California to work on the Central California water project, living in Oroville, Calif. where he also had a brother, Floyd and his family as well as other brothers who tried to stay together as much as possible.
   Ruby was always so positive, believed the world was a wonderful place, always believed in the goodness of mankind and that people were mostly good.   Ruby had been born into a Christian home but the family was not practicing a particular religion, but leaned to the Baptist.  Her mother's family were Pennsylvania Dutch, or German, very staunch and a strong mind and body.  There were always grandparents she grew up with, they loved her and set wonderful examples, she talked of them often.  When she married James Casey she became Catholic but after his death and the marriage to Glenn she withdrew from the religion, mostly because as she had a set of twins, one died, Fred, just a few days old. The baby was not baptized and she was told she could not bury her child in the Catholic Cemetery and that the baby could never enter Heaven, only had to continue in limbo.  When the LDS missionaries visited us in Omaha, NE in 1956, she was very excited by them.  We were taught by the missionaries and our family joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.  She loved the Church and was always active and involved.  She had been a Primary Teacher, taught Cub Scouts, etc., she was loved by everyone and highly respected by all.
   Ruby started working on her genealogy as far back as I can remember, always loved the family stories and wanted to know her heritage. She had so many stories she had heard from her grandmothers, so she worked to account for as much as she could until she turned the work over to me, Larry Anderson, about 1982.
   Ruby's greatest desire was to have her family together, to love each other and stay close as a family.  She was always close to her brothers and sisters and always spoke so highly of all of them.  She had a few close friends she knew all their lives until the day they died.  She also loved to cook and made the best jams and jellies, canned or bottled fruit, etc. We always had all we could eat of those items as we grew up.  She wanted her house clean and could not stand a mess, always clean and decorated so nicely.  Family pictures were her favorite and she worked for years to put all her photos together of her family.  She loved her grandchildren and was so happy to see them, always had a song for them.  I wish I could remember all of it, but the only parts I can recall was for the children:
  "The little turned up nose, the Rosy Cheeks that glow, that little babe of mine."  All my kids loved to have her sing to them and would fight over who got to sleep with grandma.  It was our honor to have my children with her to the day she died and to have her see them one last time and tell them how she loved them.  That one last touch and hug they will always remember.
   Her last months were spent living with me, Larry Anderson, in Chubbuck, (Pocatello), Idaho.  She had gone to visit Duane for a few months in Arizonia but needed more constant companionship so she was coming back to be with me when she suffered clotting and lack of oxygen during the trip here.  She was so sick by the time she got here that I had to immediately take her to the hospital where she struggled for 5 days before dying in the Pocatello Regional Hospital.  I had prayed at least to give me one more day with her, I did get that day as she was able to go off all support for a day and spoke to us, shared her love and wishes and was able to see and love the children one more time.  She went suddenly just after I had taken the children home and had thought she was doing so well we could take her home again.
   Our family was able to participate in her preparations, Ruth helped to dress her in her lovely Temple garments, Laura was able to help put the final make up on her face and bruises and to be with her in such a special way.  There was a very sweet spirit in her presence to the moment we laid her body to rest.  She was flown to Omaha, NE where the rest of the family and friends were able to attend her funeral and burial next to my father.

(From a letter, 10 March 1988) She sent me the obituary of our cousin, Rex Darst. (We were living in Fruitland, UT near Duchesne)
Dear Larry, Tammy, Children,
    Hope you got the paper back in time. No one here had $10.
 This Notice was in the Sidney paper and Duane got 3 or 4 copies made.  I sent you the original.
  It's been real nice all week & 60 today but suppose to snow tonight.
  I'm taking care of Mom for 2 weeks, Sonny will get here the 19th. She told eveyrone she didn't want to move again, she wants to stay with me gbut it's so hard.  Can't go anyplace, I'll miss church 2 Sun.  have to dress her, give her a bath, take her to the bathroom.  She can't do anything anymore.  She is walking but so unsteady we have to hold her.  But her mind is good.  She's just sort of childish.  I feel sorry for her.
 Had much snow? Let us know what you hear about the house.  I never did get that coat sent Tammy.  maybe the UPS would wrap it.  I'm not so good at that Winter will be over.
  How's Dale, Vickie and Brandon?  Tell them I said Hi.  haven't heard from Joyce for quite awhile.  Been expecting her to call.  She don't write often.  When are you getting your phone back? Love & miss all of you - God Bless, Mom

Mom was so loving, tried to always remember every grandkid and birthdate, shared everything and loved to spend time with Jacob and Larry. Her and Aunt Dorothy (Harold Walker's sister) use to take them to McDonalds every chance they had, loved the kids and they always were thrilled to be with them.  She put all her efforts to her church, went to the Temple every chance she got, Mom and dad started the families genealogy back in Oroville and were the earlier ones to get the records started.  Always loved all her family and never said anything bad of any of her siblings or families. Wanted us to always get along, love and stay in Church.

RUBY PEARL HIATT "CASEY" "ANDERSON"
1. Ruby Pearl Hiatt Casey Anderson, 88, passed away Thursday, February 26, 2004 at Portneuf Medical Center Hospital. She was born in Omaha, Nebraska to Fred Osten and Goldie Mae Teeter Hiatt on June 24, 1915.
Ruby was raised and educated in Omaha. She was very athletic person from an athletic family; she excelled in the track events, winning blue ribbons in hurdles and high jump. Her father was hired by the Omaha Police Department to play baseball on the semi-pro baseball team at that time as a pitcher. He with his brother were motorcycle officers. His brother "Pert" was the first motorcycle mounted officer in South Omaha.
At the age of 22 she moved to San Francisco after marrying her first husband in Omaha, NE. After he died of TB she married Glenn Anderson and after WWII she moved with her husband and family many times as they worked in harvest fields and later engaged in various mining opportunities in their earlier years. Most notably his career was as an electrician during WWII and with the Merchant Marines. Later he worked for several years on the Northern California Water Project out of Oroville, Calif. that provided water and electricity to much of California.
Ruby's forefathers were among the very first families to migrate to America and colonize much of America as we now know it. Her grandfathers left Virginia and the Carolinas with Boone to Kentucky in 1782 and then on to now Missouri, settling now St. Joe by 1808 and Liberty, Clay County, Missouri by 1818. Her great-great grandfather, John Hiatt along with his brothers and families from Missouri were with the Sutter’s in California and discovered gold. They returned to their homes in Sidney, Iowa and Northern Missouri to buy lands and plantations, Uncle Little Page Hiatt set up shop in Brownsville, NE, with the first grist mill and motel. Later in 1859 these families returned for the Colorado Gold Rush and settled outside Denver calling their place for luck, Golden. Later they moved into the mountains where they settled in a valley named for the first child born there, now Estes Park, Colorado. Her great grandfather, David Hiatt, assisted building the first house in South Omaha and her grandfather, Moses Hiatt, with cousins formed the J. L. Hiatt Realty Company. She started her family history and genealogy to describe her ancestors and their pioneering heritage which has grown to be one of the most extensive genealogies of America. She could claim her position in any of the prestigious historical societies in America.
Ruby married James Casey and they were blessed with 3 children, James, Delores (Susie), and Thomas, before he passed away of tuberculosis. She then married Glenn Woodrow Anderson, a father of 3 children, Phyllis, Verna, and Vernon, from a previous marriage. They were blessed with 7 children of their own, Joyce and Fred (twins), Dale, Larry, Duane, Dennis and Bruce. They later adopted Shane, a granddaughter, and raised her as their daughter.
She was a waitress at various restaurants, worked at Campbell’s Soup and owned “Home Café” in Omaha, Nebraska.
Ruby lived in Omaha about 35 years before moving to ID. She was loved and watched over by her children and grandchildren until June 2003 when she moved to be with her son, Larry (Ruth) and their family to Chubbuck, ID. She enjoyed her final days with her sons, Duane, Dale and Larry and their families.
Ruby was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, joining that church in 1958. She held positions in Relief Society and Primary where she loved to teach the young children. She particularly enjoyed going to the temple. Ruby enjoyed doing genealogy, cooking and canning Her main task and joy in life was raising and spending time with her family especially her grandchildren. The family never needed to purchase preserves, jellies and jams, candy, etc. and the table was always full of her work. She also loved music, especially a violin which her uncles played so well. Ruby was a very positive person and always saw the best in everything and everyone.
She is survived by her children: James (Lorraine) Casey, Punta Gorda, Florida; Delores “Susie” (Charles) Kocourek, Omaha, NE, Thomas (Kathy) Casey, Omaha, NE, Phyllis Anderson, Nebraska City, NE; Vernon (Peggy) Anderson, Oroville, CA; Joyce (Greg) Ortman, St. Louis, MO; Dale Anderson, Pocatello, ID; Larry (Ruth) Anderson, Chubbuck, ID; Duane (Sandy) Anderson, Lake Havasu, AZ; Dennis (Jenny) Anderson, Papillion, NE; Bruce Anderson, Omaha, NE; Shane Murcek (Anthony), Lake Havasu, AZ; siblings: Loris (Art-deceased) Klaushie, Lawrence “Sonny” (Mary Ellen) Hiatt, Dareen (Frank-deceased) Murcek, all of Omaha, NE, 42 grandchildren, 43 great grandchildren, and 2 great-great grandchildren.
She was preceded in death by her husband, a step-daughter, Verna (died as a child), a son, Fred (died as an infant, twin to Joyce); a brother, Fred “Fritz” Ivan Hiatt; two sisters, Wanda (Harold) Walker both deceased and Goldie Hiatt (died as an infant).
A viewing will be held from 6 to 7 PM Sunday, February 29, 2004, at the Chubbuck 6th Ward on the corner of Siphon and Philbin roads. Burial will take place in Omaha, Nebraska. Arrangements are under the direction of Colonial Funeral Home, 2005 S. 4th Ave., Pocatello

GENEALOGY NOTES back of paper submitted to LDS Church.
Baptized - Glenn Ruby Joyce Dale Larry 1956 Omaha, Nebraska
Duane 1958 Oroville, Dennis 1962 Oroville, Bruce 1965 Oroville, California
Endowments April 25, 1985 Ogden Temple, Utah
Sealed to Glenn Den and family, Shane & baby Fred may 26 1986 Chicago Temple
Dennis sealed April 25 1095 Ogden Temple
Shane baptized Omaha 1979


Fred Arthur ANDERSON

   Sent by Ruby Anderson. May be buried in the Sutter Cem. in Yuba Co., CA.  West out of Yuba City to Sutter.  They were living in Marysville at the time.


Glenn Woodrow ANDERSON

   Personal Knownledge.  Glenn served as a shipbuilder in S.F. during the early years of WWII, he took a job as a Merchant Marine and was at sea in a ship with only a machine gun for armament.  He told me once that a submarine pulled up along them once but it was luckily one of their own.
   Glenn never went through High School yet he was very well learned and loved to argue anything which came up.  He told me his phylosophy in life as far as getting a job was to apply for whatever position he desired, if he did not know a thing about the job he would tell them he was an expert, then when hired he would find out who the best person was at the job and go to them and explain that he was desperate to have the job but knew nothing.  He would ask if he could work along side the person and within a few days would really be an expert at about anything he ever tried.  That is how he got into ship building as well as an electrician.
   Glenn worked on many projects, such as the major Dam project of the
Missouri River in S.D. out of Pierre in the late 40's and early 50's.  He also worked on the massive Calif. project out of Oroville, Calif. and installed generators and their systems up and down the Feather River. He was very respected by those who worked with him.
   Glenn and at least some of his brothers also worked in the mines of Colorado and Utah.  He and Gerald had some investment in some mines and Gerald got him into some Oil well deals.  He could surely have told a lot of stories for us and always was going to do it but never did get around to it.
   As a young man he and all the brothers and sisters had to work hard on the farms.  It was common for them to milk several cows and do many chores before they could go to school.
   He loved country music, especially the old country.  He wrote poetry, sang and could play the harmonica quite well, I also remember he played the guitar some.  He would always like to sing silly songs to tease mom.  As kids we loved to hear him sing and be a little silly.
   He wrote a lot of things in letters towards the end, when he knew he was dying, trying to figure life out.  He worried aobut his wife and children, all of them, including step children.  An example he wrote:
  ..."For instance, you or no one can tell what I am saying unless you knew
me.  I am not a common person to know.  Sometimes it is easy to express your
feelings.  Right now I am crying inside of me.  Can I make things any plainer?  I am tired and lonesome.  Ruby, tell everyone hi for me.  My thoughts & mind is running out of words.  So here is a card.  I love you always, Glen
    Tell everyone hellow for me.  Hope your mother is well.  Don't forget Suzie & Chuckie or the rest either.      Love to all   Glenn"

   He always liked to express his mind, and to challenge himself and others.
What he did not know he liked to find out.  If you tried to argue with him, he loved it, but you had better have your facts correct, he would, and he always had an Almanac with him to prove the most off the wall facts.
   He loved animals, was as good a vet as any I have seen.  He could calm the most wild horse.  He was an excellent horseman and excellent judge of animals.  He knew the best of horses and cattle.  We had excellent stock as kids.
   He loved the Lord and knew the scriptures.  Although he was not very active at attending church, he was a strong believer and defended his beliefs.  He did not like to go to the meetings and cough so much that it disrupted the meetings.  He would make us all learn the Beatitudes and Ten Commandments.
   He smoked and was an alcoholic which caused him some difficulty for a number of years, but he quit smoking and drinking but not until his health was ruined.  The work in the mines combined with smoking and his allergies, he had asthma and bronchitus, finally destroyed his lungs, which developed enphasyma.
   Glenn never turned away from the troubles of any of his kids.  He could always find any of us, including Dale who was at times very difficult to locate in the various places he lived.
    His last plea was that we could take care of his wife, our mother.  He also wanted to be buried in the Ozawkie Cem. with his mother, father, grandparents and other family members but we never got him there.  As he knew he was never returning home from his last stay in the hospital, he wept because he said his grandchildren whom he loved would never remember him.  He loved them all.  He loved to tease them, especially Jonathan Glenn who was crippled but who would love to play with squirt guns.  His grandpa would hide from him then pop out and squirt him.  They had a ball.  His big wish was that he could see his grandchildren grow up and that they would remember him.  I know that he was anxious to also see his family who had preceeded him.  He was always loving of his own brothers and sisters and I had never heard him speak ill of a single one of them at any time.  He loved to see them, he never excluded the half brothers and sisters and never spoke of them as anything less than his brothers and sisters.
   His message to his grandchildren was not to waste their life with stupid mistakes, face challenges with determination and love of the Lord.  Love the Lord, read the scriptures and serve God with all your mind, might and strength.
    Glenn, my father, loved his families and was anxious for me to do the Anderson side of the genealogy for him.  I was only sorry that he did not see how far we did get.  He would be so excited to share in what we have done.  I
am sure he has a part in this on the other side of the veil.  As it is my turn to cross the veil I know he will be the first to greet me, and all those of his family.  His strength of family was most important to him and to honor all the family, never turn away a brother, sister, cousin or other member when we are able to assist one another.
   My father was a most wonderful person whom we all loved and respected very much.  We would never want to dishonor him or his memory in any way.  He tried to teach us all principals to live by and to be examples to our children.  He was full of feelings that he was not able to express, full of love that he did not know how to show.  He was an honest and hard working person.  He never went past the 8th grade, yet he had a philosophy of work, "Tell them you can do whatever it is they are asking for, then start to work by getting next to the best person at the job available and pay attention to them.  Soon you will also be a master at the job.  That worked for him.
   His pain in life was that few people ever tried to understand him, including his family.  He loved the out of doors and was a free spirit, he loved all out door sports, he loved to hund, fish, camp, hike and anything else he could spend time doing out of doors.
   He was an excellent shot.  One day not long before he passed away, a few of us went to our back yard and put a dime in a tree about 50 feet away.  He was weak and had a difficult time waling far and breathed hard, but as several of us kids tried to nail the target, got very close but missed the mark.  He steadied himself and in a single shot sent the dime flying, he could plug it every time.  He was the best shot I have ever seen, and that has been quite a challenge.
   He was always an adventurer, never liked to settle down for long.  He loved to travel, to see and do new things.   When he was unable to do anything as he was so ill and out of breath, he lost purpose in life.  But when his father asked him for help, (Art lived in Kansas) he went right there, he was there to help his father just the weekend before he went into the hospital the last time.  He would expect us to do the same for each other.

                            'Sonny' Back Home
           Gelding, 'Rustler' Victim, Finally Restored To Owner
LONG SERCH ENDED: Sonny, the prize winning stolen gelding,w as back home yesterday with his owner, Glenn Anderson, after having been "rustled" by horse thieves early last month.  Anderson, of 1527 14th St., Thermalito, (Oroville, Calif.) had never ceased his search for the missing animal, which finally turned up on Table Mountain.  The "rustlers" never have been caught.

   Glen Anderson's prize winning gelding, Sonny, missing since "rusters" cut through 16 fences early in November to steal the animal and touch off a posse type search by 12 Oroville area horsemen, was back in his Thermalito home
stable today.
   Anderson, of 1527 14th St., said his valued gelding was discovered by Lew Cooper of Table Mountain Ranch when the latter turned a herd of cattle loose on the mountain to feed.
   Sonny's owner was summoned and the horse was ridden to a road from where Anderson took him home by trailer.
   "I'm sure glad to get him back," the relieved owner said.  "I hadn't given up the search.  In fact I'd been looking for him just about every day since."
    Anderson said Sonny is "in good shape except his feet are a little tender."
   Meantime, sheriff's deputies had turned up no clue as to the "rustlers' who spirited the gelding away early last month.
   The quickly organized "posse" on Nov. 8th made a fruitless search for the stolen horse in the Oregon Gulch, Yankee Hill, and Jarbo Gap country.
   The posse which so valiently gave pursuit in the seeking to track down the thieves and the missing gelding was led by the deputy sheriff Leroy Woods.  They followed a twisting, turning trail that led from Anderson's pasture into the countryside.
   All the ranchers and landowners in the area also were also alerted to keep their eyes open for traces of the missing horse.
   As for Sonny, he neighed his satisfaction today at being back at his home stamping grounds and being fed special goodies to make up for his time in the wilderness.

Between exchane of letters of another cousin, Lorraine Hyatt Mayes, we compared notes and surely shared lives and times of families with my parents. Larry Anderson  She is a cousin thru the Hiatt/Hyatt but have not proved her connections but her stories are part of the history of that time and would be shared with my father so well.  My father was an excellent shot all his life, even to the week before he died he was out side the porch in Omaha and we put a dime in a tree in the back yard, houses all around and behind us, but we shot at that dime. Dale would hit and nick it as would I, send it flying, some had a good solid hit but most were corners out of it, then dad shot and nailed it dead center every time and breathing so bad with his emphasyma.  Still his shots were miraculous to us as kids, he would hit a running deer over a hundred yards and shot one that was clear across a canyon dropped immediately about 1/4 mile away.  SO the story of Lorraine here would be so fun compared to him and like to keep such stories of those of that same time.  SInce dad lived and worked in Leadville, Colorado as well as Cripple Creek, these stories are as it was of his own life he would tell us.  Larry

MY TARGET PRACTICE PAYED OFF
Living in Leadville, Colorado in the 1930’s was still a time when there was a need to hunt animals as part of the way a family provided food for their family. Our family was one of these families and each of us three children took our turn at learning how to hunt and kill certain kinds of animals needed for our own table.
My sister Lovenia being the oldest was the first child taught about these duties. But Lovenia just could not take it upon herself to kill anything and refused to even hold the rifle. On the other hand my brother Albert Jr. could hardly wait for his turn to learn how to put food on the table for us. When it came my turn to learn dad was working so much overtime that he did not have much time to train me and left it up to my brother to teach me.
I was only eight years old and Jr. was 10 years of age. Jr. had a 22 rifle that dad had given him and this is the rifle that I learned how to shoot with. We would walk out to the nearby woods and target practice as often as we could. Because the rifle was just too heavy for me to hold up and get a steady aim at the target, Jr. would place the barrel of the gun on his shoulder and then he explained how to center the tip of the gun and get a good site with one eye on the target then gently pull the trigger. It did not take me long to learn how to do this and soon I was laying on the ground on my belly with the rifle barrel resting on a rock, or I would rest the barrel of the gun on a tree limb.
After awhile I shot and killed my first rabbit and when we got home my brother taught me how to skin the rabbit so that no hair touched the skin and contaminate it. He then would take the hide and scrape all the flesh and fat from the skin rub it with salt and stretch it out on a wooden frame to let it dry out. Once the hide was all dried out he would rub salt into it with his fingers to soften the skin into leather. This could take days or weeks to make it soft enough and pliable. He then would make coin purse’s, hand bags, hats, belts and etc out of the fur hide and sell them to people all over town.
We had a carnival every year that came to town and they had a booth with a big round target and if you could shoot in the center with all six shots you would win a big prize. I was 10 years old now and had been shooting for two years and I thought I was pretty good, but I knew my brother was better wish he were here.
Oh! How I wanted one of those prizes, but I did not have any money to try. I was standing and watching everyone try and all the while I was there watching no one won the big prize the Ukulele.
As I was watching the Chief of Police came and stood beside me. He asked me if I would like to try, I said “OH! yes but I do not have any money.” He then took my hand and we walked over to the man in charge and purchased tickets so that we both could try at the same time. He then said to me “If you beat me I will buy you an ice cream.”
Well that just did it; I just had to hit the center of the target more times than he did. I wanted some ice cream and I hadn’t had any store bought ice cream in several years. We always had our own kind of ice cream made from snow with a little sugar and canned milk and only in the winter and it was now summer.
As I stood there looking at the rifle it was different from my brothers so I asked how to shoot it. The man at the booth explained what to do and it really wasn’t different it just looked different that’s all.
So I stood trying not to shake and to get a good bead on the center of the target before I pulled the trigger. Finally I got up enough nerve to pull the trigger. “WOW! I hit the center and then so did the Chief of Police. I hit the center again and again and so did the Chief of Police. The excitement of everyone that began to gather behind us was over whelming. Finally our last shot and as I stood there the anticipation began to get to me, but one look at the Ukulele, I then calmed down, pulled the trigger and I jumped with joy I had hit the center with all six shots, I had won the Ukulele.
I then waited quietly for the Chief of Police to take his last shot; I though he was taking forever to pull the trigger then all of a sudden bang and he just missed the center. WOW! I beat the Chief of Police in a shooting match and I was only ten years of age.
He did just as he said he would do he bought me an ice cream and from that day forward when I was in town and saw him I would run as fast as I could up to him just to say hello to my friend.
At that time I was sure that I was better at shooting than our own Chief of Police. I used to brag about the day I beat the Chief of Police at shooting. But as I matured I had my doubts that I could have been better than the Chief of Police. I feel now he missed the center of the target just to make a young girl happy and I now know that is just what he must have done.

My father owned a gold mine here in California in the San Bernardino Mountains at one time. He worked in the mine alone for about 10 years. There was only a small vein of gold in the mine but it was selling at a good price for those days of
$35.00 an oz. He was taking out about $500.00 to $700.00 for a months work when he worked it.
Then one of the times that he left the mine and drove down to visit my mother and the rest of the family for a week someone blew up his mine with all his ore cars, equipment and etc. He was broken hearted about it and never worked it again.
He had many offers to purchase the land and cabin but dad believed that one of the people that wanted his land could have been the one that blew up his mine. So he rented a bulldozer and moved dirt and rocks down the hill and over the original opening to the mine. Many years later after the rains had washed all the traces of his mine away he sold the land and moved to Utah with my brother on his cattle ranch. I bought the small ranch next to my brother and moved dad and mom on that land where they lived the rest of their lives.
Lorraine
It is a small world and I would bet my dad at least, knew your family, he seemed to know everyone in that area and visited there, last I remember we stopped to see some of his mining buddies in Colorado about 1962. Where is Cripple Creek compared to Leadville? I do remember him talking of both those places. He also did mine in Calif and took us to places there he use to work, the 1930's and 40's, Placerville, Hangtown, Rough and Ready, Grassvalley and other such places. Use to be quite a tour, took us to Hangtown and another, oh yes, Camptown where the old song was written. He seemed to know everywhere but today I tried to follow those places and could not find them, about 2 years ago could not find even the highway, the old Summit to Reno was gone too, we use to go there to put chains on vehicles during a winter storm. When the show would start to fall, many of the cousins and uncles would grab a bunch of chains from the local stores and run there to set up and put chains on for vehicles that could not go thru the summit without them, Donners Summit it was, sorry. Been a long time I guess, does not seem like it but that had to be about 1958-62 time too. We use to go a lot of places all gone now, Feather River destroyed along with the old ghost towns, old highways gone, new freeway systems cut off and abandoned the old stage coach roads. So few left but then I could never go back to California to live, even a visit is hard, seeing what has become of it, such sick and sad radical people destroyed everything so beautiful, northern California at least, was the most beautiful place in the world, but the later 60's and 70's ended that now there is not even a memory of most the places. I did go thru some of the old places, see some scars of what I knew and I know that behind some of the closed access roads, etc. are places that I knew so well as a child. Same as in Colorado, all gone, the old towns and places are taken over and closed off by big interest mines that grabbed everything and put guards around the entrance or access roads.
Thanks, so many memories that I had forgotten. Wish so much my father would have written his stories he had promised, a long lost era and you remind me so much of those days, my dad was born 1916, my mom in 1915, nothing seems so long ago until you see what has happened in these few years that erased all signs and memories of those times so fast forgotten. Thanks, Larry Anderson


Dorothy Jean CAMPBELL

D/o David Campbell  2nd Husband Robert Beck.  She was married a 3rd to to Mr. McMann.  Sent by Phyllis Anderson and by Ruby Anderson.
   Phyllis was living in York, Neb. and kept in touch with her family in
Kansas.  Dorothy died of heart disease.


Carolyn Jean ANDERSON

SENT IN FROM RUBY ANDERSONSENT IN FROM RUBY ANDERSON


David Newton CAMPBELL

Died of heart attack and stroke while at his daughters, Margery Wells, in Simpson Kansas.


Maude Ione BENNETT

Sent by Phyllis Anderson, January 1997.  Maude had a brother named Freedom Arthur Bennet, he died on Oct. 30, 1961 and buried in Beloit, Kansas.


John Sr. HIETT

                                 ORIGINAL NOTES OF HIATT - HIETT FAMILY HISTORY Volume I
 by William Perry Johnson and the Hiatt Family Association of Utah

CHAPTER V

JOHN HIETT, IMMIGRANT ANCESTOR

THE only clue we have as to the English home of our earliest known ancestor, the immigrant John Hiett, is found in Joseph Besse's A Collection of the Sufferings of the People Called Quakers (I, 634).  These records mention a John Hyott, of Shipton-Mallett, who was taken prisoner in Somersetshire in 1683, at a time when the Quakers were most severely persecuted for their religious beliefs.  No further record of this John Hyott has been found; the Quaker records of Somersetshire contain no mention of the name Hiatt in any of its birth, marriage, or death records. (R16).  It is possible that this John Hyott of Shipton-Mallett is identical with our John Hiett who appears in Pennsylvania around 1699.  (This was suggested by Gilbert Cope, 1840-1928, the noted Quaker Historian and Genealogist of Pennsylvania.)

There are, among the Quaker Hiatts, traditions that their ancestors came from England, Ireland, Wales, Scotland, Holland, France, and Germany.  However, all evidence found to date points to England as the ancestral home of the Hiatts.  The varying traditions can be accounted for by the fact that later generations of the family in America have intermarried with families who trace their lineage to the other European countries.

By far the most universal tradition to be found among the Quaker Hiatts is one something like this: "Our ancestors were Quakers who came from England to Pennsylvania with William Penn."  Some even make mention of John Hiatt as the immigrant ancestor.  Following are some of the outstanding traditions:

"It has been a tradition handed down through the more than two hundred years of our family history that my great-great-grandfather, Christopher Hiatt, Sr., was a son of one of three Hiatts who came over with William Penn." (William Edwin Hiatt --R17).

"…it has been a tradition with our people that the father of William (Hiatt). was John, the emigrant ancestor…as was the idea that they first came with William Penn…"(Edna G. Bender -- R18).

"My dear late Father, Elijah Coffin, had left in a book of North Carolina Families he had carefully compiled, a record that John Hiatt was father of George Hiatt who married Martha Wakefield…" (Mary Coffin Johnson - R19).

"Her (Mary Coffin Johnson's). mother was Naomi Hiatt who married Elijah Coffin, a banker, born Guilford (Co.), North Carolina.  Searched the records at Guilford in 1860.  Mary Coffin Johnson says our Hiatt ancestor was John, who came with William Penn."  "Elijah Coffin says John van Hiatt is said to have come from England in 1690, with William Penn.  I do not believe there was ever a van to our name." (Effie Hiatt van Tuyl -- R20).

"He (Curtis Hiatt). tells me his grandfather (meaning immigrant ancestor, who was actually his great-great-great-grandfather -- although this refers to his great-great-great-grandfather, George Hiatt, who was a son of the immigrant John Hiatt - ed.)  came from England; that he had two brothers, John and William, and when they came to America his grandfather settled in Virginia while one brother went to the eastern States and ours went to North Carolina.  This Curtis Hiatt was 85 years old on April 25th 1900." (Mrs.  W. C. Applegate - R21).
JOHN HIETT, IMMIGRANT ANCESTOR

"Grandfather (Curtis Hiatt). always said that the first family of Hiatts to land in this country had three boys…" "Ola (Hiatt). has among her notes that when he (John Hiatt, immigrant). came here he had two children.  Came with William Penn and settled in New Jersey."  "As I have written according to the best of my remembrance, grandfather said they (the Hiatts). came with Penn, settled in Delaware, didn't say how long, nor where they went.  But they, or their descendants, lived in the Shenandoah Valley and in Orange Co., Va."  They (the Hiatts). "settled in Welsh settlement in New Jersey, or came when Welsh did." (Clara V. Kelly -- R22).

"My father, Joseph Hiatt, handed down to me that we were descendants of three brothers Hiatt that came from England with William Penn account of religious oppression, they being Quakers, as are all the Hiatts I have known." (William Temple Hiatt -- R23).

"The sire of your great-grandfather, and of mine … w as in English Quaker, (John)., with his brother Jesse, came to America with William Penn, on Penn's second voyage, and assisted in the measurement of a second purchase of land which Penn made of the aborigines." (James M. Hiatt -- R24).

"I once noted in a work in the Boston Public Library a statement as to the Hiatt family as having once been numerous in certain counties in England.  My understanding is that they became Friends or Quakers in Fox's time and came over to Pennsylvania with Penn, or shortly after Penn's settlement; that in the course of years they moved from Pennsylvania by successive stages through Maryland, Virginia and into North Carolina and that after the slavery question came to be agitated most of them moved northwest to Ohio and Indiana and from there westward." (William A. Hiatt -- R25).

"Going back four generations, we find John Hiatt, who was born in England, and emigrated to America, first settling in Pennsylvania.  He was a member of the sect of Quakers, as have been his direct descendants." (R26).

"Three Hyatt brothers came from England in colonial days.  One returned to England one year later.  One brother moved on inland.  One lived in Guilford County, North Carolina, where my grandfather William Hyatt was born in 1775."  (Mrs. O. D. Silverthorne -- R27).

"My grandfather (Elias Hiatt). died in Oct. 1913.  Shortly before he passed away, he told me his people came from England in time of William Penn.  It seems they could not pay their debts-- many people were in the same circumstances, at that time--were thrown into prison and Penn's offer to bring them to Pa. Was a God-given opportunity, and it was gratefully accepted." (Jesse E. Hiatt --R28).

The foregoing data come from widely scattered descendants of the three sons of John Hiett, immigrant.  They speak for themselves.  Other traditions will appear throughout the volume, as well as further comment on those given above.

It is significant that of all the many and varied traditions in the Hiatt family, the one regarding John Hiatt, Quaker, from England to Pennsylvania with Penn -- in addition to being the most prevalent -- is the only one substantiated by documentary evidence.  Penn's second voyage to Pennsylvania was in the fall of 1699, and our John Hiett seems to have arrived at about the same time, for it was early the following year that he purchased three hundred acres of land in Bucks Co., Pennsylvania in, for the godly sum of three hundred and fifty pounds "current silver money."
JOHN HIETT, IMMIGRANT ANCESTOR

Following is a full copy of this document, from Deed Book 3, page 27, Doylestown, the county seat of Bucks Co., Pennsylvania :
"Deed -- John Rowland to John Hiett -- To all People before whom these presents shall come John Rowland of the County of Bucks and Province of Pennsylvania Yeoman and Priscilla Rowland wife of the said John Rowland Send Greetings Whereas there is a certain tract of land lying and being in the aforesaid County of Bucks Beginning at a corner marked post standing by the land formerly Thomas Adkinsons but now George Bile's thence Northwest and West by the said land three hundred thirty seven perches from thence Northeast and by North one hundred seventy perches to the place of Beginning Containing three hundred acres of land which said land James Claypoole and Robert Turner Commissioners of William Penn Priotary and Governor of the aforesaid Province by Patent under their hands and lessor seal of the Province dated twenty second day of the Third Month one thousand six hundred eighty six did grant and confirm unto the aforesaid John Rowland and his heirs Now Know Ye that the said John Rowland and Priscilla do hereby acknowledge and thereof do acquit and discharge the said John Hiett his heirs executors administrators and assigns by these presents forever they the said John Rowland and Priscilla have granted and aliened bargained sold enfeoffed and confirmed and by these presents do fully freely and absolutely give grant alien bargain sell enfeoff and confirm unto the aforesaid John Hietyt his heirs and assigns forever the aforesaid three hundred acres of land and premises limited and bounded as above mentioned and expressed and all the estate right title interest use possession property claim and demand whatsoever of them the said John Rowland and Priscilla of in and to the said three hundred acres of land and premises with all houses barns buildings gardens orchards meadows meadow land ways waters water courses privileges improvements appurtenances and advantages whatsoever as also the reversions remainders rents issues and profits thereof and the said Letters Patent and all other deeds writings or evidences which do only and alone concern the same Except one graveyard which is now laid out and hath been fenced and for that purpose to bury their dead is used for divers years lying near the dwelling house now upon the premises as also convenient and suitable ways or roads to and from the said graveyard for all such persons as shall think fit to bury their dead in the said graveyard and for all such persons as shall or may accompany the said deceased and for carrying or conveying the said decedents to the said graveyard To have and to hold the said three hundred acres of land and premises with the appurtenances and every part and parcel of the same Except as before excepted unto the said John Hiett his heirs and assigns to the only use and behoof of him the said John Hiett his heirs and assigns forever Under the yearly rents from henceforth to become due to the Proprietary his heirs and assigns And the said John Rowland and Priscilla covenant promise and grant for themselves their heirs executors and administrators that the said three hundred acres of land and premises (except as before excepted unto the said John Hiett his heirs and assigns against them the said John Rowland and Priscilla and all other persons whatsoever claiming or to claim by from or under them or either or any of them shall and will warrant and forever defend by these presents.  In Witness Whereof the said John Rowland and Priscilla have hereunto set their hands and seals the eleventh day of the fourth Month one thousand seven hundred 1700.
JOHN HIETT, IMMIGRANT ANCESTOR

Sealed and Delivered in the John Rowland (Seal).
Presence of us Priscilla Rowland (Seal).
William Croasdell
Peter ( his P mark). Wood
Edward (his --- mark). Hartley

The Eleventh day of the Fourth Month 1700 Received then of the within named John Hiett the sum of Three hundred and fifty pounds being in full of the within mentioned consideration money, witness my hand
Test John Rowland
Daniel Jackson
Phineas Pemberton

(The County Seal).  Bucks s s
The fourteenth day of the 8th Month 1700, The within conveyance was delivered in open Court according to law.  Certified under my hand and county seal.

Phineas Pemberton Cl Com.
Recorded the 24th day of the 8th Month 1700." (R29).

The foregoing deed is also mentioned in "Inventory of Church Archives, Penna. - Friends," compiled 1941 by W.P.A. Historical Survey -- pp. 192-3 -- Falls Monthly Meeting, Bucks Co., Penna. - : "In 1700 John Hiett bought 300 acres of John Rowland, a Quaker, who had given the land for the Watson Graveyard out of this tract previous to 1700.  The land had been granted to John Rowland by William Penn in 1683."

In 1702 John Hiett sold this 300 acres to Thomas Watson, tanner, for 400 pounds.  Deed Book 3, p.88, Doylestown, Bucks Co., Penna. : "John Hiett of the County of Bucks and Province of Pennsylvania Yeoman -- for and in consideration of the sum of Four hundred pounds current silver money -- to Thomas Watson tanner of the aforesaid County and Province -- 300 acres -- second day of ye Fourth Month one thousand seven hundred and two, 1702.
Wit.: John Hiett (Seal).
Joseph Kirkbride
Edward Kempe
Jacob Whyer (?). " (R29).

Two years later John Hiett purchased a plantation of 225 acres from Andrew Ellot of Bucks Co., Penna. Deed Book 3, p. 185, Doylestown, Bucks Co., Penna.: "May 1,1704 -- Andrew Ellot of Makefield, Bucks Co., Pa., yeoman, to John Hiett, late of the same Town, County and Province aforesaid, yeoman …. 225 acre plantation on Delaware River … consideration 250 pounds … mentions Henry Margerum's land, and Richard Hough's land.  Andrew Ellot signs by mark.  Witnesses: George Biles, Samuel Burges. (this deed is indexed as Andrew Ellot to John Ellot, rather than to John  Hiett.)  (R29).

In 1706 John Hiett sells the above tract to Andrew Ellot, presumably the same person from whom he purchased it two years later earlier.  In this deed, however, 270 acres are involved, whereas there were only 225 in the original tract.  The 45-acre discrepancy cannot be accounted for, since the four deeds given here
JOHN HIETT, IMMIGRANT ANCESTOR

are the only Hiett deeds on record in Bucks Co., Penna., and it is evident that the two plantations in question are identical.  Deed Book 4, p. 15, Doylestown, Bucks Co., Penna.; "John Hiett of ye County of Bucks in ye province of Pendilvania Yeom'n -- whereas there is a certain tract or sell of land situate lying and being in ye sd county of Bucks Beginning at a Spanish oak standing by ye river Delaware, thence by Henry Margerums land … thence by ye land of Richard Hough … Containing Two Hundred and Seventy acres which sd land was granted and confirmed unto Andrew Ellet by patent under ye hand of William Penn proprietary and Governor of ye sd province dated ye Six and twentieth day of September in ye thirteenth year of ye reign of king William ye third over England (and etc.)   And ye sd land was granted and confirmed unto ye sd John Hiett by an indenture bearing date ye first day of May in ye third year of ye reign of Anne over England (and etc.), Queen -- and to his heirs and assigns forever for ye consideration therein mentioned (by ye sd Andrew Ellot). -- 250 pounds --.
22nd April 1706 John Hiett
Wit.:
Joseph Kirkbride
Tho" Watson
Henry Margorum" (R29).

In Book A, pp. 57-8, in the Patent Rolls Office, Philadelphia, Penna., it sates that on 24 January 1701 a Thomas Terry was granted land by Penn, adjoining John Hiett, Anthony Burton and Phineas Pemberton.  Deed Book 10, p. 322, Doylestown, Bucks Co., Penna., shows that, on the 6th April 1722, John Hiett owned land in Bristol Twp., adjoining John Bowne, Lovett, Pembertin and Burton.  In Deed Book D, No.2, page 79 (1683-1809)., in Philadelphia, Penna., "John Hiett to Henry Coats."

According to Gilbert Cope's researches, there are no Hiatt or Hyatt deeds on record -- up to around 1800 -- in Philadelphia, except those pertaining to one John Hyatt of Philadelphia, Brass Founder, who died in 1747.  This John Hyatt is not to be confused with our John Hiett, Quaker.  He doesn't appear until around 1740, and as sheriff executed some deeds which are on record.  The first wife of John Hyatt was Tacy, sister of Andrew Bradford of Philadelphia, who died about 1743.  Tacy also died in 1743, and John Hyatt married in 1744 to Margaret (Assheton). Hooper, widow of Matthew Hooper (who were married in 1727).  Neither John Hyatt (d. 1747). nor his wife, Margaret, (d. 1761-2 in Phila.), left any descendants.  The wills of both are n file in Philadelphia, and nieces, nephews and cousins are the legatees, but none named Hyatt. (R30).

There was no Hyatt or Hiatt in Tax Lists of 1693 in Philadelphia, Bucks, or Chester Counties, Pennsylvania, or in the three counties of what is now Delaware.  There were no other countries in Pennsylvania at that time.  Except the above mentioned John Hyatt, Brass Founder, of Philadelphia, and his connections, and one Curtis Hyatt who died intestate in 1798, no other Hyatts are in Philadelphia wills up to 1800, and none appear in wills of Bucks, Chester, Lancaster, Berks, York, or Cumberland Counties, Pennsylvania. (R30).

Also, according to Gilbert Cope, the following Quaker records were searched for John Hiatt, but without result: Salem Monthly Meeting, New Jersey, established about 1676; Burlington, New Jersey, 1678; Chester, Pa., 1681; Philadelphia, Pa.,1682; Abington, New Jersey, 1682; Middletown, Pa., 1683; Falls, Pa., 1683; Radnor, Pa., 1684; Darby, Pa., 1682; Concord, Pa., 1684; Nemark (now Kennet)., 1686; Duck Creek, Delaware, 1705.  These were all the early Quaker Meetings in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware. (R30).
JOHN HIETT, IMMIGRANT ANCESTOR

The fact that John Hiett's name fails to appear on these early Quaker records could be accounted for in many ways.  He may have been disowned for some minor offense, or for having dissenting views, which the Quakers called "disunity."  Or there may have been no meeting close enough to his wilderness home to permit even an irregular attendance.  And, of course, many of the older records are incomplete, or lost or destroyed.  Lastly, it is possible that he may have attended Quaker meetings more or less regularly, but without taking any active part and even failing to take time to actually become a member and to have his name and the records of his family recorded by the meticulous Quakers.  Also, the Quaker influence in the family may have been more strongly manifested by the wife and mother.  That such may have been the case in this instance is indicated by the fact that Falls Monthly Meeting in Bucks, County, Pa., makes one brief reference to a "Mary Hyot", who was "received on certificate"  the 7th of 6th month 1706.  (R31.)  A "Mary Hyot", Quaker, at this early date and in this locality could scarcely be none other than the wife of our John Hiett, Quaker, the immigrant ancestor.

In speaking of Richland township, Bucks, in his History of Bucks Co., Pa., (II, 601).states that the "families of Roberts, Foulke, Gilbert, Nixon, Edwards, and Hyatt were prominent among those who formed the early community" --- this was in the early 1700's.

Of John and Mary Hiett, little more is known.  John Hiett is called "yeoman" in the early deeds of Bucks Co., Pa.  A yeoman is a freeborn common man of the most respectable class; a freeholder.  This tells us nothing regarding his occupation.  John Hiett owned land, but may have farmed it himself.  He is known to have resided in the town of Makefield in Bucks, Co., Pa., at one time, and it is possible that he was a merchant, by which means he acquired the three hundred and fifty pounds (over $1500). to make his first purchase of land in 1700.  Andrew Ellet, from whom John Hiett purchased land, was a merchant.  Our John Hiett is probably identical with the John Hyatt who was a witness to the will of Thomas Masters of Philadelphia, Merchant, dated 4 December 1723. (R30).  Also, he is probably the John Hyatt who was a witness to the will of Abraham Bickley, a Quaker merchant of Burlington, New Jersey, and Philadelphia, Pa.  Will proved in Philadelphia 28 March 1726 -- liber 2, p. 321 (New Jersey Archives, 1st. Series, XXIII, 37).  John Hiett may have resided for a time in New Jersey, which was just across a river from his Buck's County holdings, but probably spent most of his life in Pennsylvania.  He evidently died intestate, since no will has been recorded.  Mary Hyatt signed the marriage certificate of John Townsend, of Bensalem twp., and Grace Croasdale, of Middletown twp., dated 15th of 6th mo. 1745.  (R36).

Mary Coffin Johnson (R19). discovered somewhere in her Hiatt researched the tradition that the mother of her great-great-grandfather, George Hiatt (married Martha Wakefield)., was Mary Smith, a daughter of, or a sister to, a John Smith.  Also, that George descends from a John Hiatt, immigrant ancestor, and that there was a William involved somewhere along the line.  So, when she found a William Hiatt of Frederick Co., Va., who died in 1767, naming an eldest son George, she immediately claimed this George as her great-great-grandfather.  She further assigned Mary Smith as the first wife of this William, for it is a matter of record that he married a second wife, Alice Louden, at Hopewell in 1748; and she placed this William as son of John Hiatt, immigrant.  Traditions, of course, no matter how badly twisted, are always based on fact.  That the mother of George Hiatt was Mary Smith, is substantiated by documentary evidence; and the William
JOHN HIETT, IMMIGRANT ANCESTOR

involved turns out to be George's maternal grandfather rather than his own father.  The immigrant ancestor John Hiatt, but it was George's father rather than his grandfather.  And, lastly, Mary (Smith). Hiatt did have a brother John Smith.

Some fifty miles southwest of Philadelphia, in the northeast corner of the state of Maryland, lies the county of Cecil.  It was here, in Cecil Co., Md., that William Smith wrote his will on the 20th of September 1708; it was proved the 20th of May 1710.  He leaves to "2nd son John and hrs., 1000 A., dwelling plantation -- to daughter Mary, wife of John Hayet and granddaughter Hannah, daughter of son William, personalty (personal property - editor.)  -- Exrs.: wife Grace and son John --Test: David Evans, William Smith. 13.113." (R32).  It is quite significant that the John "Hayet" named in the will becomes John "Hiett" in further court proceedings regarding this will.  From this evidence, both traditional and documentary, it is reasonably certain that the wife of our John Hiett, the immigrant, was Mary Smith, daughter of William. (R33).  For those interested in a further investigation of the Smiths, it is suggested they check the William Smith, Quaker, who brought a certificate to Philadelphia, for himself and wife and family, dated 1699, from Glastonbury Monthly Meeting in Somersetshire, England.  (R31).  It is quite possible that our John Hiett, the immigrant, came to America with his wife's family.  William and John Smith, brothers of Mary (Smith). Hiett, sons of John and Mary (Smith). Hiett.

As to the now familiar "three Hiatt brothers", they were, as denoted by both documents and traditions, John, Jr., George, and William.  Early in the 1730's John had removed to Lancaster County Pa., newly created from Chester, one of the three original counties of Pa. In 1682 (the other two were Bucks and Philadelphia)., but by 1733/34 had removed to Virginia.  George Hiatt remained a few years in Bucks County, later removing to Maryland, Virginia, and finnaly settled in North Carolina. William Hiatt also settled in Lancaster County, but soon followed his brother John to Virginia.  All this will be given in detail in subsequent chapters.

****************

JOHN HIETT (Immigrant Ancestor).:

b. c1674 (?)., England; d. post 1726, Bucks Co., Pa. (?).; m. c1695 (?)., England (?)., to MARY SMITH, daughter of William and Grace (--). Smith; b. c1677 (?)., England; d. post 1745, Bucks Co., Pa.  This family belonged to the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers). in England, possibly fleeing, as did many of the sect, to Holland or France to escape persecution the latter part of the 17th century, before coming to America.  (There are traditions to this effect -- editor.)
John Hiett was probably a farmer, and, possibly, a merchant, also.

CH: (2.)  John, Jr.; (3.)  George; (4.)  William


NOTES ON JOHN HIATT and MARY SMITH, of BUTLEIGH, SOMERSET, ENGLAND
I wanted to put a note here up front to make sure it is noticed. With several other researchers over time, I have seen evidence, stories, etc. that indicate John Hiatt was a merchant and had ships or involved in shipping. Also of note is that the Hiatt and Anderson families were entrenched in marriages and friendships, etc. as well as being Quakers so that it indicates a long standing tie between the families. This is important in that there were Hiatt as well as Anderson brothers on the ship "Merchant Bonaventure" 1634. Also that James Anderson had signed documents of John Hiatt, Jr. at least and it appears that James Anderson is the father of Susannah Anderson married to John Hiatt #37. Further ties continue as branches of families continue thru the westward movement into OH, IN and Iowa, etc. Please refer to the complete report and history as given under Thomas Anderson, b. 1616. Larry Anderson
[no title] DD/S/BT/6/8/3 1700
These documents are held at Somerset Archive and Record Service
1 doc.
Contents: 1] John Hiett late of Butleigh but now of Pennsylvania, America and wife Mary 2] Henry Coate of Kingsbury, yeoman Mortgage of Hiett's messuage, 6a in the moor, Darksome (1/4a), 4a at East end by Barton river, 2a at Whitewell, 6a at Shilfehedge, 6a at Brownswell ragg (2a), paddock (3/4a), 40a arable in West field and 37 1/4a in the East field, Butleigh. Also very proximal to this record are: Related? has to be?
[no title] DD/S/BT/6/8/4 1706-1707
These documents are held at Somerset Archive and Record Service
1 doc. Contents: 1] Samuel Chapman of Butleigh, yeoman 2] Richard Hyatt of Kingweston, carpenter Assignment of 1a at Nurslinge gate in Butleigh West field. AND [no title] DD/S/BT/6/8/5 1715
These documents are held at Somerset Archive and Record Service
 1 doc. Contents: 1] Richard Hiatt of Kingweston and wife Amy daughter of John Gregory decd 2] John Gregory of Butleigh, yeoman and son of John decd 3] John Reynolds the elder of Kingweston, yeoman
Assignment of 1a at Nurslinge gate in the West field and 1a at north end of the East Field, Butleigh.
1. Thomas2 Anderson, Sr. (Richard1) (Source: Patrick J. Anderson, "Suspected but unproven," Working Papers 2004.) was born October 06, 1616 in Stallingborough, Lincolnshire, England, and died Aft. 1651 in Gloucester County, Virginia. He married ?.

Notes for Thomas Anderson, Sr.:
Thomas Anderson arrived on the ship "Merchant Bonaventure" having embarked in January 1634/5 for Virginia, his age is listed as 18. He lived at Gloucester Point on York River according to tradition and was a shipwright. Gloucester Point is on the North Bank of the York River across from current Yorktown.

King Charles the I, of England, about the year 1635 became disenchanted with the mismanagement of the Virginia Colony by the London Company and revoked their charter and took control of the activities of the colony. In addition to sending lawyers to set up the government offices in Jamestown, including creating 6 county governments and a land office in Jamestown and organizing the militia, King Charles also solicited volunteers among the shipyards of England to go to Virginia and establish repair yards for ships engaged in the Virginia trade. There was a great need for those yards to take advantage of the plentiful Virginia timber which was becoming scarce in England and to provide repair facilities for ships engaged in the Virginia trade. Thomas Anderson apparently responded to this call.
There are Anderson's of the colonial period of the Gloucester County area and it is possible that some of them descend from this man. It is possible that he had several sons and it is important to remember that at this early time his sons may have resettled almost anywhere on the shores of the Chesapeake Bay. The following record indicates that Thomas Anderson survived along the York River until after 1651.

Virginia Patents Book 2, pge 310

William Guinsey 300 acres York County, 3 April 1651 upon southward side of Mattapony River, which tract is about 10 miles up the River. Transport of 6 persons: Wm Guinsey, Geo. Talker, Thomas Anderson, Ben. Dudley. (sic only 4 listed) The area of William Guinsey's patent is in the same vicinity that Robert Anderson, Sr. established himself by 1666 and is possibly the reasoning behind the claims that Thomas was the founder of the New Kent County Anderson family in the following 1881 newspaper article. This leaves us with competing claims that the Reverend Richard, John or Thomas may have been the father of the Andersons of New Kent.

From the Richmond Virginia Standard, March 12, 1881 by B. A. Brock
Thomas Anderson was the traditional founder of the Anderson family near Gloucester Point where he founded a shipyard in the 17th century. Another representative of the family settled in St. Petersburg, Russia. It is claimed that an emblazoning of Thomas Anderson's arms is extant as follows: Vert, three bucks lodged or. Crest--A buck lodged, holding in the mouth an accord leaved, and wounded in the breast by an arrow. Motto--Nit desperaudum, ausplee Dec. (Recent DNA on my direct line also reports show that there are DNA direct strain matches in Russia, interesting. Larry Anderson)

From: Rubroc2@aol.com

See newspaper article in The Daily Progress, Charlottesville, Va. 02/26/1984. Merchant Hope, ship that brought Richard
Anderson to Va. in 1635. His sons John and Thomas were in the shipbuilding business in Gloucester Pt., Va. I have found no supporting evidence that this Thomas Anderson had any family at all, however there remain un attributed Anderson's of Colonial Virginia born in the 1637-1660 period who may well be his. Because early Colonial Gloucester County records were destroyed in an 1820 fire the records to connect them may be lost.

                           Found in HH Book by Wm Perry Johnson and in Hiatt Family by John Beasley.
The first statement for the record will be a disclaimer that any lineage to generations beyond this John have not been proven and are for research suggestions and speculation only. I do suspect there to be truth to it, but how much or proof to any degree is not known. Please take anything beyond our imm. ancestor cautiously. With further work and joint efforts perhaps enough may be gained to prove or disprove any and all claims.

There is another point that must be cleared because it has been widely circulated. There is no tie nor evidence linking our JOHN HIEGHT/HIATT, to Jost HITE, or any other variation of the German lines. I have seen that name along with our Hiatt, etc. clan, but that line has had no connection to our lineages whatsoever that I have even had a hint to other then some intermarriages between families. The Hite line is of a German lineage which bears no relationship to our English roots of HIEGHT, etc. families.

Through an old day book which has been in the possession of the Descendants of George Hiatt, our family had fled to an area around Greenag Ireland, just north of Dublin and after only a couple of years, came to this country in 1699. The above record, the whereabouts today is not known, stated that John was born in England in 1696, George in Ireland in 1698. Information was copied by Deane Younger of Colorado from this day book, she has also been looking for the complete record which would be of extreme interest and value to all of the descendants of John and Mary Smith Height. Perhaps it might yet surface and we might find much that we have been missing for many generations. LA
This family of Hiatt, Hiett, etc. belong to the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) in England. They were driven from England to Ireland and possibly fleeing, as did many of the sect, to Holland and France to escape persecution the later part of the 17th century, before coming to America. John Hiett was probably a farmer, and possible a merchant also.
Sent by Clifford Hardin. From The Ancestors and Family of J. Alvin Hardin. by Dorothy Hardin Massey and Clifford Hardin.

It has generally been accepted that John and Mary Smith Hiatt were the immigrant ancestors of our Hiatt family. Also it is generally believed, but not proved, that they and at least three sons arrived in America on the ship Canterbury in 1699 with William Penn when he returned for the second time.
A deed not included in the Hiatt-Hiett book was located in the Maryland records (Cecil County, Md. deeds, Vol II, page 321). It was dated 26 May 1715 and indicates that John Camp (Kemp or Kempson) and wife Mary of Elk River in Cecil County sold 50 acres of Dare's Desire to John Hiatt of the same place. The deed was witnessed by John Smith and Edward Jeffes.

Earlier, on 27 July 1708, John Hiatt was appointed administrator of the estate of William Smith in common with James Robinson and Sampson George. (Testamentary Proceedings, Cecil County, Maryland, Liber 21, folio 61) John Hiatt and this William Smith appear to have been brother-in-law, and this William also appears to have been the son of Williams Smith, Sr. who died in 1710.

John Hiatt had married prior to 1700 Mary Smith, daughter of William Smith, Sr. who had been living in Cecil County along the Elk River since at least 1703. Cecil County Deed, Vol 2, page 321. According to the will of William Smith, Sr. dated 8 September 1708 (Cecil County Wills, Liber AA folio 135) administrators of the estate of William Smith, Sr. were William's son, John Smith, Nicholas Hyland and Sampson George of Cecil County. The John Smith who witnessed the 1715 deed between John Hiett and John Camp and the William Smith for whose estate John Hiett was administrator were almost certainly Mary's brothers.

These events indicate that John and Mary Smith Hiatt were living in Cecil County, Maryland, as early as 1708. Their land was located on the Elk River adjacent to land owned by the Smiths and several members of the Hollingsworth family.
The authors of this volume are uncertain whether there were two John Hiatt, one in Bucks County, Pennsylvania and another in Cecil County, Maryland, or whether John and Mary Smith Hiatt actually moved back and forth -- a distance of about 70 miles. If it should eventually be proved that there were two John Hiatt, then we are convinced that the patriarchs of our Hiatt's who were in Frederick County, Virginia by 1734 were from Cecil County, Maryland and for reason which are outlined below.

First, John Hiatt, Jr. -- so called when he purchased land in Orange County, Virginia, from Stephen Hollingworth in 1737 -- was noted as from Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Lancaster County, Pennsylvania and Maryland was complete in 1767, the northern part of Cecil County, Maryland, was often considered to be a part of Lancaster or Chester County, Penn. Some deeds were recorded in both states. Further, land records of Lancaster County indicate that 200 acres patented to John Hiett in 1733 was in Strasburg Township. Strasburg Township at this time was located near the Maryland border just north of present day Harford County, Maryland -- a distance of some 25 to 30 miles from Elk River in Maryland. The land in Lancaster County was reassigned in 1744 to another person.
In Cecil County, Maryland, Henry Hollingsworth purchased land adjacent to John Hiett and John Smith along the Elk River in 1712. Henry Hollingsworth and his son, Stephen Hollingsworth witnessed several of the Smith deeds in 1711 to 1714. (Cecil County Deed, Vol 2) In Frederick purchased land in 1737 located on Opeckon Creek from Stephen Hollingsworth who was known to have moved from Elkton, Maryland to Frederick County, Vir. about 1733. Stephen Hollingsworth's son, George, had land adjacent to John Hiatt Jr.

John Hiatt's brother-in-law, John Smith who had married by 1711 Jane Hinton, daughter of Rees Hinton, (Cecil County Deeds, Vol 2 page 186)

neighborhood as the Hiatts and Hollingsworths. Hopewell Meeting records that Jane Smith, wife of John Smith of Opeckon removed from Chester Meeting on 26 5 mo. 1736, " She being removed a considerable time." There is no known relationship between the Hollingsworth and the Smiths and Hiatts other than they were neighbors in both Cecil County and Frederick County.

The seventy families who moved to Frederick County, Vir. about 1733 founded Hopewell Meeting. Most of them were from Chester County, Penn. or Cecil County, Maryland -- not Bucks County, Penn. A few were from New Castle County, Delaware. The family of John Hiatt, Jr. was one of these seventy family.
There is no evidence that John and Mary Smith Hiatt were Quakers in Maryland, although the next generation were members of Hopewell Meeting in Frederick County, Vir. Certainly John and Jane Hinton Smith were Quakers. No probate records were found for John and Mary Hiatt in Cecil County, Maryland or in Frederick County, Vir. None have been found in Penn.

There were other Hiatts in Maryland prior to 1700, but no connection has been found to exist with any of them. John and Mary Smith Hiatt may have had children other than the three sons who have been assigned to them. For example, on 28 March 1716, Peter Bouchelle married Mary Heyatt in St. Stephens Parish in Cecil County, Maryland. Mary Heyatt could have been a daughter of John and Mary Smith Hiatt.
Found in Early Births Western Fredrick Co., Va and Eastern Hampshire Co., West Vir. Compiled by Grace Kelso Garner and Ralph L. Triplett. 1976. List Hiett, John .."The Immigrant" born in England 1658. He had Wm., Jno. Jr., George, Mary, Rebecca, Sarah.

Found in The Winchester Journal-Herald, Saturday, Dec 28, 1946. Randolph Co., Ind. History of the Hiatt Family page 6. Little if anything is known definitely about the English antecedents of the Hiatt's. It is known that they were early Quaker immigrants and were in Bucks County, Pennsylvania before 1700, thought be some to have arrived with Penn on his second voyage in 1699. This ancestor was John Hiatt. A Mary Hyot mentioned in the records of the Falls Monthly Meeting (Bucks' County, Pa) in a certificate dated 1706, is thought to be the wife of John Hiatt. Three sons, George, John and William have been assigned to John and Mary Hiatt, although they doubtlessly had other children. Cecil Co., MD, part of Baltimore Co.

This leads me to Cecil Co., MD where John HIATT/HYATT, county land records. Richard Kempston (KEMP, CAMP) An earlier, John Kemp and wife Mary. In the book "Abstracts of Cecil Co., MD Land Records 1673-1751, by June D. Brown, pg. 99

Pg. 321, Deed, John CAMP of Elk River, Cecil Co., MD and wife Mary, for 15 lbs to John HIETT of the same place, 50 acres of land, part of 200 acres of land called Dare's Desire, near the head of Elk River. Made 30 Dec 1714/15. Wit., Edward Jeffes, John SMITH, Ackn: 17 Jan 1714/15 JP's Will'm DARE, Nicholas HYLAND. Rec.: 26 may 1715, Dowdall, Clerk.

Of curiosity in this same book, page 193, DEED:

Seth HYATT of Prince Georges Co., and Alice his wife, formerly the daughter of Clem't and Alice Davis, for 25 pounds, to Amos Garrett of Ann Arundel Co., Merchant, a one-forth part of a tract of land (150 acres) in Cecil Co., on the north side of Sassafras River. Said land part of 600 acres which was laid out for Jarvis Morgan, late of Ann Arundel Co., deceased, called Middleneck. By his last Will and Testament dated 10 Jan 1698, Jarvis Morgan bequeathed the 150 acres to the said Alice Davis, wife of Seth HYATT and daughter of Clement and Alice Davis, his (Jarvis Morgan) brother and sister. Made 12 Dec 1718. Wit. Jo. Young, Amos Woodward, Mary Scorke, Ackn: Same day before JP Samuel Young at Annapolis. Rec.: 9 Feb 1718. S. Knight, Clerk.
Kathy Kemp Dobe, by Email March, 2000

References:
(1) Information supplied by Mr. Michael H. Charles, 1824 Penfield Road, Penfield, New York 14526. (2) The Visitation of the County of Gloucester, 1682-3. by Fenwick, page 96. (3) Hiatt-Hiett Family, page 33.

Historical Notes:
(1) John Hiett was the Immigrant Ancestor for this family. DATE 1683

Belonged to Society of Friends in England. In 1683, at a time when Quakers were most severely persecuted for their religious beliefs, in Somersetshire, England, a John Hyott of Shipton-Mallet was taken prisoner. No further mention of his has been found. Could be the same John Hiett who appears in Pennsylvania around 1699.
John Hiatt/Hyott/Height/ etc. was a "Yeoman", which means he was a free born common man of the most respectable class and a free holder of land. He was also associated with Thomas Masters who was a merchant.

Subject: Does this sound right to you Larry? Date: 6/4/2010 10:05:54 A.M. Mountain Daylight Time From: davidleehiatt@comcast.net
Reply To: To: LarryAndy@aol.com
John came from England with William Penn's second voyage in the fall of 1699. He was a member of the Quaker sect. John's occupation was that of a farmer and a merchant. He was a member of the religious organization, "Society of Friends" in England * from Marie Ballen- Moulton, Iowa: The Heitts/ Haitts were Quakers in England fleeing from persecution to Holland and Normandy, France. Many family members died before coming to the United States. The Hiatt England History was complied by William Perry Johnson via Marie Ballen. The following is what is known of the life of John Hiatt (name sometimes) spelled Hiett) John Hiatt was born about 1674 in England and was a Quaker before the death of George Fox, the founder of the Society of Friends. When John Hiatt was about twenty one years of age, he married Mary Smith, the daughter of William and Grace Smith. What happened to them after their marriage in England if not clear, but there was a John Hiatt that was taken prisoner in Somerset-shore in 1683 (this date should probably be 1693) at the time the Quakers were persecuted. The record says that he lived in the village of Shipton Mallet. It may be the same John Hiatt, (then again it may not). At any rate, he turned up in Pennsylvania in 1699 and bought 300 acres of land in Bucks Co. for 350 Pounds. His deed is in the Courthouse at Doylestown, the seat of Bucks Co. John was about 26 years of age at this time, (his wife was 22). They had three small sons, the youngest a little baby.-There is another deed on record there, dated 1706 when John Hiatt bought some more land in Bucks Co. on the Delaware River that had originally belonged to William Penn. Further records show that John Hiatt was alive in 1726, but do not show how much longer he lived. His wife, Mary was alive in 1745 at the age of 78, but her death date is not known.-Each of the three sons became ancestors of large relationships.

There was a Day Book, lost as of abt 1985 when I last communicated, but that book written in 1700's claimed that our Hiatt's had been in Greenag where George was born. No place has been found by that name so have doubted what was written but thanks to Internet and others help there may be an answer to explore further.

Subject: Greenag Date: 9/20/2011 2:44:59 A.M. Mountain Daylight Time From: maureen2411@tiscali.co.uk

Hi Larry, Hope you don't mind me replying off site but Ireland really doesn't come under the heading of Somerset !! In reply to your question Do I come from Ireland? No I don't! I hail from Devon in the west Country of England. My husband and I were both in the Navy and he then decided that he wanted to retire back here. Paddy is the one that researches Irish family History, very difficult because a lot of the records were burnt in the Four courts Fire in Dublin in 1922. I asked him about Greenag, and he went on to a site he uses( Sean Ruad) and he came up with 2 possibilities. You have to bear in mind that ag is soft over here. Anyway GREENAGH, poor law District of Killarney County Cork. The other one is now classed as being in Northern Ireland, GREENAGHAN near Larne in County Antrim.

Hope this helps. Paddy also suggested that if you are researching Irish connections that he suggests ROOTSCHAT Ireland. If you are looking at Northern Ireland he is KINGSKERSWELL and spends most of his day helping people from all over the world.
A
s an added thing, Kingskerswell is the name of the village in Devon that I hail from! Bye for now Maureen

Subject: Hietts in Butleigh up to 1699 Date: 7/1/2012 3:42:44 P.M. Mountain Daylight Time From: rcsenior@yahoo.com Reply To: To: LarryAndy@aol.com
Dear Larry, Assuming that this e-mail address is still working I thought you might like to see my website www.butleigh.org  and under Butleigh people see the Hiett entry. I have transcribed the Butleigh Registers as well as the churchwardens accounts and the Overseers of the Poor. All in all there are clues to the story of the John Hiett who emigrated to Pennsylvania, and his wife Mary Smith. The problem you face in deeper research is that the information doesn't and never will exist. We had a vicar here, John Radford, who didn't keep a single record 1677 - 1714 and John's marriage and the birth of his children all would have taken place here in Butleigh [his wife was born here too] during this period, but no record ever kept. The William and Grace Smith were almost certainly here too but again the records fall into the gap period or are on the damaged pages of the Butleigh Parish Records. I don't feel that the Smith 'Glastonbury' link exists as such - exiles often wrote 'Glastonbury' when they came from Butleigh, just as the present postal address is Butleigh, Glastonbury,Somerset [ we are just 3 miles south of Glastonbury]. The William Smith actually born in Glastonbury died there and his children's baptisms contradict the Mary Smith one here in Butleigh [which I believe no one else has recorded]. However, the Hietts DO seem to have their prior origin in Street, which is also just three miles away.I will update the files shortly - but this family is only one of thousands I am researching with Butleigh connections.
Best wishes,
Bob Senior
rcsenior@yahoo.com

Dear Bob, I am beyond hope and thrill to imagine there is someone that could assist in our search. It was by fluke, luck and providence that any record or clues were found to tie our John Hiatt and Mary SMITH to Butleigh, ha, had never heard of Butleigh but of course Somerset we suspected long ago. I am attending a reunion that has major interests in these tid bits this month and will present any possibilities and hope there. We most likely would be excited to hire and pay for all services and discoveries with great pleasure. Our family had come to the Colonies with William Pen via Ireland, arriving here by 1699. I have massive records of this family since, my data base of all ties and families are near 400,000. Of course I have hundreds of family ties to England, some proven centuries past. One had been a vicar also, a William Eddy, of the Eddy families of America posterity. I am most anxious to hear from you in any regard to our history from England.

My Ancestry had all left England between the Jamestown period, Mayflower, Quakers etc. all before the mid 1700's. To find history anywhere of that period and beyond is exciting.

There is a story that our John Hiatt had been imprisoned in the Tower of London for defying the King and marrying Quaker. One fun story,lost in history, but passed down, is that John was offered a title if only he paid a fee. It is said that when offered he responded saying, If it is an honor I don't have to pay for it, and if I have to pay for it, it is no honor. Interesting anyway. SO question would be, could there be court records, civil records, land records in reference to our families. Is there a way to match and verify our John Hiatt to his family, parents and siblings?

It was also thought that John Hiatt/Hiett was a yeoman, a merchant and had some wealth, he was well represented in land and properties here. Thank you for your contact, so excited to know more. There are also DNA projects on these families that could later be of help.

Sincerely, Larry Anderson President National Hiatt/Hiett Family Organization 14223 W Promise LN Chubbuck, ID 83202

Hi Larry, I can see where it can get confusing, as so many small villages so close to Glastonbury. For one thing, I suppose that Glastonbury was and still is the biggest town in the area. The Abbey was destroyed by Henry VIII and the Abbey was a big player at that time. Interesting, thanks for sending the information.

Glastonbury has lots of History, the Abbey, the Glastonbury Tor on the Hill, etc. I remember a sign which said not to pick the apples off the trees or the ground, because the Monks used them to make Cider and other fun things. I admit they were beautiful Red Apples and the trees were loaded. Some ruins of the Monks kitchen remained, such as the large open oven, and of course part of the Abbey and Tor on the Hill. If I can find some of the pictures of Glastonbury I will e-mail them to you. There is a small narrow ravine not too far, called Cheddar Gorge, not really a Gorge, just vertical rock ravine. So many Tourists you can't even see the ravine. I don't know where the name comes from, as I don't know where the English Cheddar Cheese is made,,,,it could be near the Gorge. Ciao for now,

Lew (Lewis Hiatt, living now in Illinois, was from Oroville, Calif at the same times I lived there and grew up.)
Subject: Re: Hietts in Butleigh up to 1699 Date: 7/2/2012 2:27:37 A.M. Mountain Daylight Time From: rcsenior@yahoo.com
Reply To: To: LarryAndy@aol.com

Dear Larry, I am retired and do my research as a hobby - I don't accept payment for anything and everything is freely available on my website. All the Hiett material I have seen regarding John's origins is pure speculation and fantasy. It isn't surprising since the records don't exist now, as explained in my previous e-mail. He certainly wasn't a yeoman or wealthy, though being a ratepayer meant that he did own some land in Butleigh and I suspect that his move to America from Butleigh was direct without any diversion to London or Ireland or any adventures on the way. You will find references to him, his family and the Smith family under the headings churchwardens accounts and Overseers of the Poor on my website, as well as the genealogical section. What is clear is that he and the Smiths were in Butleigh up to 1699 and disappear from here that year. Sometimes the obvious and true explanation isn't as romantic as ones we might wish [and family 'legends' are nearly always exaggerations] but accuracy is better than concoction.
You may not have heard of John Rastell - he was one of my ancestors and tried to sail a ship to America in 1517 to found a colony [his brother-in-law was Sir Thomas More who wrote 'Utopia'] but the captain stole the ship when it was being provisioned in Ireland! His son, also called John, sailed on another exploration - to Newfoundland - in 1536 [the Hore expedition] but they returned in disgrace with some of the crew having eaten a few shipmates in their distress when the Indians didn't provide them with supplies!
Regards,
Bob

from Bob, above, many other references and historical data with possible links and lineages, hopefully to come forth.
1 July 2012
Dear Larry, There are houses in the village that they can date the beams of to the 1200's by dendrochronology but most houses are post 1700. I doubt there would be any way to identify the Hiett houses with any certainty but who knows, some people have all sorts of strange information of their house deeds - but village people are a bit secretive and don't like to show you such things. I have only been here 33 years which makes me still an 'outsider'!
I would be interested in ANY records you have of anyone who claimed to come from Butleigh, Butley or Glastonbury who migrated to America.
Regards,
Bob
Hiett Heiatt - Hyett etc.
A Robert Hyett (d. circa 1558) acquired Wootton estates in 1545 from Edward Carne. His son Thomas sold some of the estate to Richard Walton in 1566 though retaining a life interest which he subsequently sold to Andrew Dyer. (VCH) Not known if there is a connection between that Thomas Hyett [who also held estates in Street] and the Thomas and John Hiett of Street below, or Richard Hiett of Butleigh. Because the vicar John Radford didn't keep any baptism, marriage nor burial records during his tenure 1677 -1714 there are impossible gaps to fill in this genealogical data but the origin of the family seems to be above named Street branch, using the same forenames and with dates that fit fairly perfectly, and so I am taking them as being the same family here. The Street family disappear as their namesakes appear in Butleigh and Kingweston and John Hiett is recorded as departing Butleigh for Pennsylvania and his in-laws the Smiths also disappear in 1699 - just as they too are recorded as traveling to America with a Quaker exodus including William Penn.

A) John Hyett of Street is mentioned as Overseer when referred to in the will of Roger Dovel dated 30 Jan 1571. [Jewer's notes] Probably the father or possibly brother of the next;

1) Thomas Hiett Married: [Alice? - see below][the widow with missing forename bur. 1650 Street?]
Children: 1) Thomas s.o. Thomas bur. 8 Jan 1600 Street 2) John Chr. 22 Feb 1602 Street Hloy Trinity (1a) 3) Alice Chr. 14 Aug 1605 Street [an Alice Hiett bur. 14 Mar 1629 Street, could also be the mother] 4) Edith Chr. 20 Mar 1607 Street m. 4 Nov 1639 Street Richard Bartlett 5) Elizabeth Chr. 20 Jan 1610 Street m. 1 May 1637 Street George Charde (Coward) Besides Thomas a Nicholas Hiett living in Street fathered a Mary (Chr. 23 Sep 1608 Street) - Nicholas appears in Jewers Notes as son-in-law of Joane Brawdrip [Will of 6 Sep 1570 Street] - Nicholas buried 6 Oct 1610 Street. Edith and Elizabeth Hyett were left small legacies by 'cousin' Agnes Keene [Will 3 Jul 1635 Street] as was cousin Agnes Chard. John Hyett helped compile the inventory of Thomas Barry's will of 13 Aug 1631 Street. [all from Jewers Notes].
1a) John Hiet [the John who was buried 3 Feb 1649 Street?]
Married: Alice [Alice, widow bur. 22 Jun 1665 Street] Children: 1) John Chr. 18 Apr 1636 Street (1a1)? 2) Robert Chr. 11 Mar 1637 Street 3) Richard Chr. 10 Jan 1640 Street (1a2)? Besides John an Alexander [bur. 5 Aug 1685] was fathering children in Street at this time and another Thomas [bur. 22 Mar 1688] and Mary (nee Peddle) Hiett : Alice Chr. 24 Mar 1674, Mary Chr. 25 Jun 1676 and a John Chr. 22 May 1677 1a1) John Heiatt [Chr. 18 Apr 1636 Street] d. Butleigh 1686? John paid rates in Butleigh from 1681-6 when his property becomes 'late John Hieatt deceased' - see below.
1a2) Richard Hiett [Chr. 10 Jan 1640 Street s.o. John and Alice Hiet?], d. Butleigh 1686? Married: ? [probably died. Before 1688 for children to be taken in by other people - or re-married] Children: 1) Richard (1a2A) [a Richard Huett Chr. 1 Dec 1667 Street s.o. Richard Huett seems likely] 2) John [Chr. 27 Apr 1676 Street] (1a2B) 3) George [probably Chr. Butleigh post 1677] Richard was churchwarden in 1684-5 and paid rates from 1681-6. The Richard and George who received relief (+ stockings and shoes) in 1687 may have been his children (or John's). They received this relief again in 1688 and '89 in which latter year George was taken in by Robert Barnard and Richard by Edward Jacklett. In 1687 the rates were paid by John Hiett and his neighbour (looking after George) was Robert Barnard. From 1688 the rate was paid jointly by Robert Burnard and John Hiett until 1695 when it was just John Heiat again - up to 1700 when he emigrated to America. All this time the adjoining property was was 'late John Hiett deceased' [see (3)]. In 1703 Richard Heiatt becomes a rate payer - but on a different property and was there until 1707. Probably the Richard Hiatt who was in Kingweston in 1715. In 1687 the Overseers 'charged for the relief of Richard Hieatte & George Hieatte £1 8s, paid for a peare of shoose for Richard Hieatte 1s 10d for a peare of stockens for George Hieatte 7d and a peare of drawers for Richard Hieatte 1s 4d. In 1689 They paid Robert Barnard for George Heiates relife 1s 6d a weake for 50 weakes and Edward Jacklett for Richard Hieates relief 1s 6d a weake for 5 weakes.They also paid Thomas Jacklett £1 10s for clothes for Richard Hieatte when he was bound out to him.

DD?S?BT?6/8/5 1] Richard Hiatt of Kingweston and wife Amy daughter of John Gregory decd 2] John Gregory of Butleigh, yeoman and son of John decd 3] John Reynolds the elder of Kingweston, yeoman Assignment of 1a at Nurslinge gate in the West field and 1a at north end Date: 1715.
1a2A) Richard Hiett [Chr. 1 Dec1667 Street], of Kingweston bur. Jun 1725 Kingweston
Married: Amy Gregory Chr. 24 May 1675 Kingweston d.o. John Gregory of Kingweston bur. 8 Mar 1745 Kingweston
Children: 1) John Chr.10 Jul 1706 Kingweston bur. 19 Jun 1715 Kingweston 2) Amy Chr. 10 May 1708 Kingweston 3) Mary Chr. 29 Dec 1710 Kingweston 4) Hannah? Chr. 19 Jun 1713 Kingweston Illeg child) Amy Chr. 4 Mar 1753 Kingweston 5) Thomas Chr. 23 Apr 1715 Kingweston bur. 8 Sep 1723 Kingweston 6) Grace Chr. 25 Aug 1718 Kingweston
1a2B) John Hiett [Chr. 27 Apr 1676 Street, s.o. Richard Hiett] d.c. 1727 America
Married: c. 1695 Mary Smith [Chr. 22 Apr 1673 Butleigh] d.o. William and Grace Smith #, d. 1745 Bucks County, Pennsylvania
Children: 1) John b. 1696 [probably Butleigh] 2) George b. 1698 [probably Butleigh] 3) William b. 1700 Bucks County, Pennsylvania Another John Hiett was also Chr. 22 May 1677 Street, s.o. Thomas Hiett. DD/S/BT/6/8/3 1] John Hiett late of Butleigh but now of Pennsylvania, America and wife Mary 2] Henry Coate of Kingsbury, yeoman Mortgage of Hiett's messuage, 6a in the moor, Darksome (1/4a), 4a at East end by Barton river, 2a at Whitewell, 6a at Shilfehedge, 6a at Brownswell Date: 1700. John Hiett, arrived in Bucks County, Pennsylvania in the autumn of 1699. On 11 April 1700 he purchased 300 acres of land (Bucks Co. Pennsylvania DB 3, page 27) from John Rowland for 350 p. (The foregoing deed is also mentioned in the 'Inventory of Church Archives, Pennsylvania - Friends' . ( In 1700, John Hiett bought 300 a. of John Rowland, a Quaker, who had given the land for the Watson Graveyard out of his tract previous to 1700. The land had been granted to John Rowland by William Penn in 1673. In 1702, John Hiett sold this 300 a. to Thomas Watson, tanner, for 400 p. (DB 3, p. 88) Deed book 4, p. 15, Bucks County: On April 22, 1706, John Hiett of the County of Bucks in ye province of Pensilvania Yeom'n - bought land granted and confirmed unto Andrew Ellet by patent under the hand of William Penn ". John's wife was Mary Smith, the daughter of William and Grace Smith. William lived in Cecil County, Maryland, where on the 20th of May 1710 his will was proven.

Some 50 miles SW of Philadelphia in the north east corner of the State of Maryland, lies the county of Cecil. It was here, in Cecil Co., MD that William Smith wrote this will on the 20th of September 1708, it was proved the 20th of May 1710. He leaves to 2nd son John and heirs 1000 acres, dwelling plantation, to daughter Mary, wife of John Hayet, and granddaughter Hannah, daughter of son William personally (Personal property) . Executors wife Grace, and son John. Teste: David Evans, William Smith 13:113. The name Hayet becomes Hiett in further court proceedings regarding this will.

Both, Hietts and Smiths families were members of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) in Somersetshire, England. William Smith, the Quaker, bought a certificate to Philadelphia for himself and wife and family, dated 1699, from Glastonbury Monthly Meeting in Somersetshire, England. It is quite possible, that our John Hiett, immigrant, came to America with his wife's family. William and John Smith, brothers of Mary Smith Hiett, are probably the ancestors of the Smiths show settled in Virginia in the same community and at about the same time as did John Hiatt Jr. and his brother William Hiatt, sons of John and Mary Smith Hiett.

Mary Hyot was noted in the Falls Monthly Meeting in Bucks Co. PA, she was received on certificate the 7th of the 6th month in 1706.

The History of Bucks Co. Pennsylvania mentioned that the families of Roberts, Foulke, Gilbert, Nixon, Edwards and Hyatt were prominent among those who formed the early community, his was in early 1700's.
John Hiett is called a yeoman, in the early deeds of Bucks Co. A yeoman is a freeborn common man of the most respectable class, a freeholder. John is known to have resided in the town of Makefield in Bucks Co. at one time, it is possible that he was a merchant, by which means he acquired the 350 p. (over $1500) to make his first purchase of land in 1700. Andrew Ellet, from whom John Hiett purchased land, was a merchant. He is most probably identical with the John Hyatt who was a witness to the will of Thomas Masters of Philadelphia, Merchant, dated 4 Dec. 1723. Also he was a witness to a will of Abraham Bickley, a Quaker merchant from Burlington, New Jersey and Philadelphia, PA. ( Hiatt - Hiett, Genealogy and Family History, compiled and edited by William Petty Johnson, Payson , Utah ) 2) Joane Hiett

In 1680 a warrant was issued for Joane - possible wife or daughter of one of the above? A Joan Hewet was born 1 May 1655 Street d.o. Alexander and Jone Hewet, the latter also having a daughter Elizabeth Chr. 9 Dec 1649 Street. A Joan Huett was bur. 29 Nov 1686 Street.

3) Walter Hiett b. 1825 Taunton, tailor, s.o. James and Mary Hiett, died 1908 (Mar Q 5c/271 Langport) Married: 1897 (Mar Q 5c/723 Wells) Elizabeth Britton b. 1835 Taunton # Elizabeth Britton was the widow of William S. Britton. This couple lived at Rockwell [Brittons Court] in 1901. Walter was thrice married and his two previous marriages took place in Taunton in 1876 (Martha - who died in 1879) and 1880. Walter was the son of a tailor, James Hiett (b. 1796) and his wife Mary, and appeared with them in 1841. He appeared with his widowed father in 1851 and with two of his sisters (at 3, Murry's Court, Taunton) in 1861. In 1871 he lived with one of his sisters, Mary Tapper, and her daughter, at 5, Paynes Court. He seems to be missing from the censuses in 1881 and also 1891 when he was married to his second wife. He died in 1908 aged 81.

Dear Marty, Larry,
As you can see from my website I am trying to research hundreds of Butleigh people at the same time, from all periods. It is only now and again that I give one surname a bit more deserved attention and that happened with the Hiett's a few weeks ago. The surname spelling was entirely a matter of whim according to the scribe or clerk - based on the phonetically pronunciation - there were no dictionaries of surnames, hence the very wide variety of spellings of this surname and also there are misread transcriptions. There wasn't a RIGHT spelling at that time.
The John of Butleigh was the son of Richard, grandson of John and great-grandson of Thomas. I still haven't found the link between the Thomas having children in Street [3 miles from Butleigh] from circa 1600 and the Thomas Hiett son of Robert Hiet who was alive in the late 1500's. It shouldn't be impossible but the problem is always time - there will be clues in some of the documents that I have listed but not yet read. I found the older Thomas acting as a witness in a will in Butleigh in the 1560's just today.
I live in Butleigh, England and most of the documents are in Taunton [27 miles away] but at the moment I do not have the time to go and look at them - I am also pre-occupied with transcribing many other Butleigh wills, a sons marriage and visiting relatives in Germany!
The other John Hiett in Street seems to have disappeared and I haven't tried to follow that line up. Only a limited number of forenames seem to be used by any one family and John is one of the commonest. He was obviously a cousin of John son of Richard who was in Butleigh.
As soon as I can, probably in October, I must transcribe the document 'DD/S/BT/6/8/3 1] John Hiett late of Butleigh but now of Pennsylvania, America and wife Mary' and its contents to see if there are any additional clues there and also 'DD/S/BT/5/7/4 1] John Hiett of Butleigh, yeoman and wife Mary'.
Hope this is of some help.
Best wishes,
Bob Senior
On 29/07/2012 12:57, Marty Hiatt wrote: Dear Larry, Thank you ever so much for sharing the details about Hiatts in Butleigh, England. I've read it all, but just once. Bob Senior has made a wonderful contribution to our cause. Does he live in England?
At the end of your email I found the following summary, but now I'm confused.
Who was the father of our John Hiett, the man who married Mary Smith and immigrated to Pennsylvania? Was it Richard, or Thomas?Was Richard really a Hiatt, or a Hewitt/Huett?
1a2) Richard Hiett [Chr. 10 Jan 1640 Street s.o. John and Alice Hiet?], d. Butleigh 1686?Married: ? ______ unk. [probably died. Before 1688 for children to be taken in by other people - or re-married]
Children: 1) Richard (1a2A) [a Richard Huett Chr. 1 Dec 1667 Street s.o. Richard Huett seems likely] 2) John [Chr. 27 Apr 1676 Street] (1a2B) 3) George [probably Chr.Butleigh post 1677]…
1a2B) John Hiett [Chr. 27 Apr 1676 Street, s.o. Richard Hiett] d.c. 1727 America Married: c. 1695 Mary Smith [Chr. 22 Apr 1673 Butleigh] d.o. William and Grace Smith #, d. 1745 Bucks County, Pennsylvania
Children: 1) John b. 1696 [probably Butleigh] 2) George b. 1698 [probably Butleigh] 3) William b. 1700 Bucks County, Pennsylvania

Another John Hiett was also Chr. 22 May 1677 Street, s.o. Thomas Hiett. DD/S/BT/6/8/3 1] John Hiett late of Butleigh but now of Pennsylvania, America and wife Mary 2] Ms. Marty Hiatt, CG
Certified Genealogist is a service mark of the Board for Certification of Genealogists, used under license by Certified Genealogists after periodic evaluation by the Board.

6 December 2012


I hope this finds you well.  I know that I promised you that I would send a transcribed copy of the deed from Buttleigh Parish in Somerset. It took me longer than I thought to transcribe, and then I kept forgetting to send that off to you. So, I thought I'd better do it today while it was on my mind. When I got the original document, the provisions for selling me a copy said that I was not allowed to publish it in any form. I don't know if that means in a transcribed form. At any rate, I'm sure I can share it with one cousin. I would ask that you not publish this to the whole group, since I'm not sure if that is covered. And certainly do not add it to the book, unless we can get permission to use it therein. I would like to see this done, if it is possible. It would be best if we could include the original image as well, but that would probably take some doing to get permission for that. I don't know.

Indenture made the thirtieth day of April in the twelfth year of the reign of King William the third ye anno dei 1700 between John Hiett late of Buttleigh in the County of Somerset in the Kingdome of England but now in the Province of
Pennsilvania in America Yoman and Mary his wife of the one part and Henry Coate of Kingsbury in the said County of Somerset of the other part Witnesseth that the said John Hiett as well for and in Consideration of Two hundred pounds of
Lawfull mony of England To him in hand payd Before the Ensealing and Delivery hereof By the said Henry Coate The Receipt thereof Hee the said John Hiett Doth hereby Acknowledge: And thereof and every part thereof Doth Acquitt and forever Discharge the said Henry Coate his heirs Executors and Administrators by these presents As also for and in Consideracon of the Summ of Two hundred and Eleven pounds more of like mony By the said Henry Coate Secured To be payd to the said John Hiett his Executors Administrators or Assigns within the space of one month next after the said Henry Coates first and next Arrivall in England. In manner following To witt one hundred and Sixty pounds thereof to Daniel Yeates his Executors or Assigns to Discharge of the Mortgage which he hath upon the hereby granted premises And the Residue thereof to the said John Hiets order and for divers other good causes and consideracons him the said John Hiet thereunto moveing Hath granted bargained sold alienated released and confirmed And by these presents Doth grant bargain Sell Alien release and confirm unto the said Henry Coates (in his Actuall Possession now being By virtue of a bargain and Sale To him thereof made for one whole Year By Indenture bearing Date the day before the Date hereof And by force of the Statute for Transferring uses into possession And to his heirs and assigns all that messuage or Tenement where the said John Hiet lately dwelt and all outhouses, barns, stables, buildings Yards, Backsides, Orchards, Gardens, Cartilages and Appurtenances whatsoever hereunto belonging Situate and being in the Parish of Butleigh aforesaid And all and singular those several Plots or Parcels of Land Commons Meadow Pasture and Arable hereafter particularly mentioned That is to Say two Commons in the Moor containing six acres Lying on the north side of John Hiets Common One acre and one Quarter of an Acre called Darksome Joyning to Clifhord? four acres at the east? end Joyning to Barton River two acres of whitewall Joyning to Charles Strodes land six acres at Sheepshedge Joyning to Henry Popes land six acres at Brownswell Joyning to John Chesos land one Pasture called Ragg Containing two acres Joyning Widow Hilliars land a Pasture containing Three Quarters of acre Joyning to William Corners Orchard Forty acres of arrable land in the west field and thirty seven acres and one quarter of an acre of arrable land in the east field together with all the said John Hiets right in all the Commons adjoyning or in any wise Belonging to the herein bargained premise All which said plots or parcels of land being in all by Estimation one hundred and eight acres and one Quarter of an acre be the same more or less belong to or ---------- [word faded and too difficult to read] Usually occupyd with the said Messuage or Tenement and are situate lying and being in the Parish of Butleigh and now are or late were in the Tenure or Occupation of John Browning or his assigns or undertenants And all and singular ways: waters easements watercourses ffiffings? ffowlings? commons ---idibles Privileges and Advantages whatsoever be the said Messuage tenement land and premises belonging or in any wise Appertaining or therewith being occupying or enjoyed reputed or taken as part parcels or member thereof And the Revisions and Remainders Rents and Profits of the same And all deeds Evidences and Writeings concerning the premises To have and to hold the said Messuage and tenement and all other premises herein mentioned or intended to be hereby bargained and sold with their and any of their appurtenances unto the said Henry Coates and his heirs To the use of him the said Henry Coates his heirs and Assigns forever And the said John Hiett for himself and his heirs Executors and Administrators Doth covenant and grant to and with the said Henry Coates his heirs and assigns by these presents in manner following To Witt That he the said John Hiett now is and Standeth lawfully and rightfully seized of and in the said Messuage or Tenament And all and singular the said plots and parcels of land and other the premises with all their Appurtenances of a good sure perfect absolute and indefeazible estate fee Simple And now hath good right full power and Lawful authority to grant and convey the said messuages land and premises with their Appurtenances unto the said Henry Coate and his heirs and assigns forever according to the purport true grant and meaning of these presents (the above said Mortgages to the said Daniel Yeates onely excepted And that it shall and may be lawful To and for the said Henry Coate his heirs executors or assigns to pay the said Daniel Yeates his executors or assigns the said one hundred and sixty pounds in discharge of the same mortgage And the same shall be allowed and deducted out of the Last payment of the consideracon mony above mentioned and that from and after the payment or lawful tender of the said one hundred and sixty pounds is made by the said Henry Coates his heirs executors or assigns to the said Daniel Yeates his executors administrators or assigns according to the true meaning hereof and the parties hereunto It Also shall and may be Lawfull to and for the said Henry Coates his heirs and assigns from tyme to tyme and at all tymes from henceforth forever Peaceably and Quietly To have hold possess and enjoy the said messuage lands and premises herein before mentioned and Intended to be hereby granted and their appurtenances without any Lawfull Lett Suite Trouble or Interuption of him the said John Hiett his heirs or assigns or any other person or persons whatsoever ffreely acquitted or Discharged of and from all manner of encumbrances whatsoever Saving the rents and services from henceforth to grow Due and payable to the Lord or Lords of the ffee of the premises and that the said John Hiett and the said Mary his wife and their heirs, shall and will at any tyme or Tymes hereafter During the Space of Twenty years Next Ensueing the Date hereof upon the request and at the cost and charges in the law of the said Henry Coate his heirs and assigns make done execute acknowledge and suffer or cause to be done executed acknowledged suffered all and Every such further and other act and Acts conveyances and Assurances in the Land whatsoever for the further and better conveying and Absolute confirming and Assureing of the said messuage lands and premises hereby granted with their appurtenances unto the said Henry Coate his heirs and assigns contained And so as the parties To make the same Be not controllible To travel above Twenty miles from the place or places of their usual Abode for doeing thereof And the said John Hiett for him and his heirs the said messuage lands and other the premises hereby granted with their appurtenances the said Henry Coate his heirs and assigns Against him the said John Hiett and his heirs and against all persons whatsoever Lawfully Claiming or to Claime By from or under him them or any of them shall and will warrant and forever defend by the presents In Witnesse whereof the said parties to these presents Have Interchangeably Set their hands and Seals hereunto the Day and Year first Above written.

I hope that this is useful to you. It doesn't really give any more information than we had from the
abstract supplied by the National Archives site. It was very difficult to read, since my copy was small and the original looks like it has faded. It took a magnifying glass and several weeks for me to get through it. As I studied it,
though, I got to be familiar enough with the handwriting that I believe this to be a faithful transcript. I preserved the spelling as it exists in the document.   Sometimes it is hard to tell whether a capital was meant, so, I may have missed
a few capitalizations. However, I tried to reproduce it as faithfully as I could.

John is #1 in Hiatt- Hiett genealogy book


Mary SMITH

  Mary Smith (Lois as middle name commonly given but I have seen no source for this at all. LA)  was the daughter of William Smith and Grace, this much we do know positively.  Also it seems fairly plain that at least John and Mary appear to have been on the same vessel which carried Mary's parents and brothers to the American shores in 1699.  However, there is much lacking in our research concerning the brothers of Mary, or even more so, any possible sisters or other siblings other than the John, George and William Smith.  It would be an interesting task to search some of these further connections for at least a few generations.
   I can recall mostly forgotten stories passed down through our family that we were related to Captain John Smith and an Indian maiden.  Further, as we have heard from our cousins, many of them quite distant, we have heard similiar stories of some connection to this famous personage.  Genealogies and especially traditions and stories of lost orgin are alway intriquing, interesting and often puzzling and perhaps impossible to follow or prove, but still they are worth passing on as a tradition, and who knows, perhaps someday the proof of the stories may find a way to surface.
   In the March 1986 Hiatt Family Newsletter, we included a part of this
tradition which was also believed and followed further by Dr. Joseph Copeland.  He passed away not long after this and his work was never published.  I was highly questioned and criticized by that story as it is known and proven that this Indian Princess married a John Rolfe, and no one has proven any relationship, marriage or otherwise, to Captain John Smith.  Even if there were a relationship, or marriage, it would not have been a legal one according to the English law of the day.  Any child born would have been illigitimate with no claim to titles, lands or properties relating to the family.  Such a child may even be shuned or denied by the rest of the family.  If that is so, then there will be little hope of finding the proof needed to document this claim.  However, I still submit this as a tradition and a theory and personally believe it has merit.  Perhaps someday someone might stumble upon the proof or disproof.  Until then this line is included only for your interest and sharing.
   Through some correspondence Dr. Copeland wrote ..."I have been working on my ancesty for the past few years since I retired.  I am especially interested in the Copeland and Hiatt families paternal and maternal families.
    I have my ancestry back to the 1600's for 61 out of  64 ancestors.  All
were Quakers, beginning with the Immigrant John Hiatt and his wife Mary Smith.  On a separate sheet of paper I am sending my Hiatt lineage as I have it.  And the Smith lineage with notes and with comments as to the probable accuracy.

    Generations 1 to 4 are unproven and are from traditions largely from my aunt Daisy Hiatt, sister of my mother, Alice Hiatt."

HIATT - SMITH LINEAGE
1.  GEORGE SMITH m. ALIICE RICKARD        WAHAN SONACOCK  m.  WINGANUSKE
    b. ca 1555       b. ca 1558          b. ca 1540        b. ca 1570
                                              ALGONKIAN (Native Americans)
                                                Chief of          Queen of
                                                Powhatan          Powhatan
2.  Capt. John Smith  m.   MATOAKA (POCAHONTAS) b. ca 1595/6
     b. ca 1579           ALGONKIAN (Native American)
     Arr. Jamestown, Va.  Princess of Powhatan
          1607              (Perhaps mistress rather than wife)
     d. 1631 never        m 2nd to John Rolfe and had a son Thomas Rolfe.
     legally married

3.  PEREGRINE SMITH    m.  Mary
   b. ca 1637             b. ca 1617 parentage unknown
   Named after Peregrine Bertie,
   son of Lord Bertie. *Said to have
   had a sister, Mary.
4.  William Smith      m. GRACE               JOHN HIATT     m.   MARGARET
    b. 1643             b. ca 1646           b. ca 1650          b. ca 1652
                                              Parentage          Parentage
                                              Unknown            Unknown
5.  MARY SMITH         m.    JOHN HIATT
   b. ca 1675               b. ca 1674
   Imm. Quaker              Imm. Quaker

6.  GEORGE HIATT       m.    MARTHA WAKEFIELD
   b. 1698                  Imm. from Ireland
    Greenage, Ireland       b. ca 1700  Quaker Minister

7.  William Hiatt       m.   Charity Williams
   b. 1742 Quaker           b. 1750 Quaker

8.  Benajah Hiatt       m    Elizabeth White
   b. 1773 Quaker           b. 1770  Quaker
     Minister                      Minister

9.  John Hiatt          m    Rebecca Unthank
   b. 1804 Quaker            b. 1806  Quaker

10. Josiah Hiatt        m    Rhoda Sheridan
   b. 1830 Quakere           b. 1839 Quaker

11. Alice Hiatt         m    Albert Luther Copeland
   b. 1871                   b. 1874
    Quaker Missionary         Quaker Minister

12. Joseph J. Copeland   m   Freda Luretta Bailey
   b 1907  Birthright        b. 1905, joined Quakers
           Quaker
13. Janet Mrie Copeland  m   Alex Ciegler
   b. 1931                  b. 1924

14. Karen Audrey Ciegler  m  Craig Hansen
   b. 1952                  b.  1954

15.  Joseph Craig Hansen
   b. 1984 - Named after Great Grandfather Jospeh J. Copeland and his father
Craig Hansen.

    His line is carried on down to his own person and to a grandchild, Jospeh Craig Hansen who was named after himself, Joseph Copeland.
    Joseph Copeland, a birthright Quaker was a retired proffessor.  He had told me that he had carried on work that his grandmother and mother had been doing for the past 100 years and that he was planning to publish his research
of this line.  But as so often seem to happen, he became ill and apparently was never able to complete his task.  Perhaps we can watch for this to come about through his children or grandchildren.  There are many who would be very interested, I'm sure.
    After publishing this lineage, I was heavily questioned about it as there is nowhere recorded a child by John Smith and Pocahontas and it is known and recorded that she was married and had a child by John Rolf.
    However, since there was no real interest in trying to prove such a line
for well over 100 to 150 years later, no one seems to have taken much effort to record many things which were later important to our family histories.

     However, many a novelist has speculated of the relationship between this Indian maiden and Capt. John Smith.  It must be realized that in those times it was quite common to marry at an age of 14 or so, and that this Indian maidens love was quite a topic of authors.
    In general, we know that the English laws of marriage were very strict and must be sanctioned by the Church of Enland in order to be recognized as a lawful marriage.  In cases where subjects did not follow this order, they were often imprisoned and could have their lands and possessions confiscated.  Children of such a marriage would have been illigitimate and not have claim in the English courts.  This may have been the case as it was with John Hiatt and Mary Smith.
    We find that as they were married by the Quaker Church their union was declared illigitiate, and John imprisoned, after which time they went to Ireland as a temporary stop before making the exodus to the new lands.
   Lands and properties were handed down through legal heirs, thus, it may have been that Perequin was never recognized as a legal heir, thus may never find a record of him as such.  Certainly one would not hope to find a marriage bond as surely there would not have been one.
    Life being as it was, and love and passion the same as today, would it not be nieve to think that Capt. John Smith, being lovingly cared for over a three year period in the wilderness of this new world would not have had a
relationship with his benefactor.  Surely in the American Indian ways, she was at least in a sense wedded to her beloved Capt. John Smith.  If we could suppose this to be such a possibitlity, than would it still be not natural for a child to have been born them?  Surely even without proof, this is a natural conclusion and it would certainly fit the traditions which have in various forms, been passed through many generations.
    Also, as the story goes, John Smith as a young man, was raised with Lord Bertie's son, Peregrine.  Also that these young men toured much of Europe together and were best of friends, thus when John's son was born he named that son after his lifelong friend, Peregrine.
    Dr. Copeland also noted that Peregrine may also have had a sister, Mary. Of course it must be stated that this is speculation, perhaps enough to cause one to use it as such to try and find records which may prove or disprove any
or all of it.
    We cannot rely on anything beyond William Smith and Grace as being proven, but it certainly is based upon some research and tradition.  After Dr. Joseph Copeland passed away we have lost contact with his family and do not know what became of his research.  He had planned to publish his research and work, we would love to see it and to have hope of discovering clues which might lead to proof.  This information is only shared with hopes that someone with knowledge and ability may uncover the documentation of this postulate.  Perhaps someone working on some data will, by pure accident, discover the missing documentation, perhaps with this information, even as it is, may spur research by a person or persons who might complete the work.


See www.familysearch.org

search on a FamilySearch ID (the ID # after the name) to find latest detail, contact info., pictures documents and more.